Learn how the case of a man whose heart stopped beating for 1.5 hours and was revived just as doctors were preparing to harvest his organs is sparking ethical debates in France in this medical report.
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Dr. Susan Sharma: This is insidermedicne in 60 From Paris - The case of a man whose heart had stopped beating for 1.5 hours and was revived just as doctors were preparing to harvest his organs is sparking ethical debates in France. The man had suffered a massive heart attack and, after being presumed dead, began breathing on his own and woke up moments before going under the knife. A committee has been organized to discuss the ethical issues surrounding these circumstances. From Boston - As the cost of cigarettes continues to rise, people are switching to alternative tobacco products. From 2000 to 2007 cigarette sales declined 18%, while sales of other tobacco products counteracted about 30% of that decline, as these products are not taxed as heavily as cigarettes. The researchers conclude that in order to help curb tobacco use, all tobacco products should be taxed equally. And finally, from San Francisco - Diabetics receiving weekly injections of an experimental drug lowered their glucose levels and lost weight over the year they were on the medication. In a study of 295 patients, 74% of those who received the once-weekly version of the medication exenatide achieved the ADA target for good glucose control, and lost an average of 9.5 pounds after a year. The existing version of exanatide on the market must be injected twice daily. For Insidermedicine in 60, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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