While my wife and I were on our honeymoon in Banos, Ecuador, we ran into Aracely who wants to run in the NYC Marathon if her knee pain doesn't get in her way.
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Bill Parravano: Hello and welcome, it's Bill again. We are on location here in Banos, Ecuador. My wife and I are traveling on our honeymoon and we met another couple that is also traveling. And I'd like to introduce Aracely Santos. And we were talking last night and it turns out she has knee pain, she is a runner and so I thought, her significant other has a video camera and I though it would be a great opportunity for her to share her story, I'll do a little bit of work on her knee and we'll see how that turns out. So Aracely, would you like to share your story? Aracely Santos: Sure. About three years ago I started to get into running and then just last year, we did an Urbanathlon and the process of the Urbanathlon is you run and you do obstacles, like there is hurdles, you'll have to crawl. And on the last jump I just felt that I did something to my knee, it was like a jolt or, I felt that I still had a lot of the race to go. And ever since just my knee hasn't been the same, if I run more than six miles it starts to hurt, if I sit for too long it starts to hurt, and I'm just afraid that I'm never going to be able to run the way that I did before this happened to my knee. Bill Parravano: So what we're going to do is take a look at the tension pattern that is holding on in your knee to see if we can let go of that tension pattern allowing the body to reflex, allowing the body to let go off that tension until. And what we're doing here, I use the example many times like the Chinese finger games, when you pull the fingers apart in the game it makes it tighter and when you push the fingers together it looses it up. And this is the very same thing we are doing with your knee; we're taking it to a place where it takes the pressure off of the tension pattern in your knee and then we wait for your body to give us a clue like you may feel pulse, you may feel heat or the knee may rotate back, the bottom part of the leg may rotate back. And that's what I'm feeling right now. Okay so let's take a look at another aspect of your knee. Because sometimes when we jump down the bones in our leg, this is the bottom part of your leg, this is the top and what will happen is the bones will slide, just slightly and it will hold that pattern, once again that's to protect your knee from getting injured further, however it will lock in that position. So we're going to take and see -- just let your leg drop, right in there, does that take the pressure off of what's going on in that spot on your knee. Aracely Santos: Yeah. Bill Parravano: Okay, so once again we found a place of comfort. Aracely Santos: Yeah. Bill Parravano: For your knee. And what this is doing is, reeducating your knee to understand what comfort is and we'll hang out in that position for a little bit and wait for that to begin to let go. Go ahead and see how that feels. Aracely Santos: Looks good. Bill Parravano: Okay did it move again? Aracely Santos: No I don't, it feels good. It's a little soaring inside. Bill Parravano: Little soaring there inside there? Aracely Santos: Yeah. Bill Parravano: And many times what happens is that the meniscus, which is the shock absorber within the knee gets smooshed, kind of like a took a piece of bubble gum with two bricks and the bubble gum will kind of squeeze out side of those two brick and it will be kind of soar in there. Aracely Santos: Yeah, right there. Bill Parravano: So what we'll do is we will give space and you let me know if there's any discomfort in there. I'm giving a little pressure on the outside of the leg and pulling the ankle in at the same time. What this does is it allows for the meniscus to pull back in between the bones. Now go back and check in there. Aracely Santos: Yeah, it is good. Bill Parravano: Okay and consequently what happens is, if these tension patterns are not addressed it continues to hurt, and it continues to wear away. In many times, there is no indication that anything is wrong because nothing is broken or t

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