The Journey Toward Bipolar Recovery Video

In this medical health video depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) community members share their stories and discuss how treatment, medications and support have helped them cope and recover.
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The Road to Recovery Carroll Young: I was given treatment involuntarily, okay. I reported to the police that there was a fire, of course, there wasn't. I think that I have to give the police a credit; they could see that there was something missing there and so they took me to the hospital. Thomas Johnson: I had changed my life a lot. I had to take an early retirement in '94 at 49. That was my 31 years of working. Carroll Young: I was very resistant to medical therapy using prescriptions and I asked my daddy, "Dad, you know, I really don't want taking medicine." And he said, "Well, I think you should take it. If it helps you deal your life better, I think you should take it." Thomas Johnson: The word for me is adherence. Adherence and belief in what my doctors told me and taking my medication and even though it was hard, making the changes in my lifestyle. Sonia Denice Harris: One of the main things that I do to try to maintain the illness as far as depression is concerned is exercise. And that's something that I wasn't motivating at first to do, but something about exercises helps me overcome that down feeling of depression. Thomas Johnson: I am a crossing guard and this is my tenth year and now it's been very gratifying. Many of the people know that I have bipolar; mothers and fathers, the school does and there has never been any problem and being with the children everyday, even just for those couple of hours and being outside and exercise and so forth, those are things that are really important to try to help myself maintain. Carroll Young: I don't really see the doctor that long, 20 minutes at the most, and that's not very often. So groups like our support group at home, the DBSA, Frankfurt helps me quite a bit because when we meet, I hear how other people are relating to their illness and I realize that I am not alone in the vacuum, I am not the only person in the world that has a challenge. Sonia Denice Harris: I'd say as a message to communicate to people in the Mental Health community is to stay with it, stick to it, always stay with a support group and never give up. You are worth living for it.

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