In this video, Dorothy Thomas exposes the idea of reading to children and the benefits of this practice.
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Wendy Turner Webster: Hello and welcome to Baby Talk on the Baby Channel. I'm Wendy Turner Webster we've got a distinctly literary theme for todays shows coming up Dorothy Thomas editor of parenting website bounty.com is here to tell us why is it so important to read your little one because later childrens all Gillian Shield's will be here on the, so if reading from the her book to star light baby and talking about her career so first of all I would like to welcome Dorothy Tomas to the show hello Dorothy? Dorothy Tomas: Hello. Wendy Turner Webster: How are you? Dorothy Tomas: Fine, thank you. Wendy Turner Webster: Good excellent, now you if had course to do quiet a big research project recently haven't you all about that the pros an cons of bed time reading and the importance of it or not just tell be of about how will that research came about? Dorothy Tomas: I'm Bound to did some research around national story telling week of the end of February. Asking parents whether or not they read to the children of bed time and there are about 2000 parents followed and the results came through and they were, little bit startling one in 10 parents never read to their children at bed time and one I think its 13% who read to them very other night so there is no philosophical children out there, who want having a bed time story. Wendy Turner Webster: Did your research sort of acetone, why that one in ten what did you get the reason why they were doing it. Dorothy Tomas: Busyness too many other things occupying the parents time and diverting the children, so its sometimes hard to find the time and to make the time to sit down at the end of the day establish that kind of bed time routine were you tuck your little one up in bed get their favorite story often read it to them and its not everybody that who do that naturally some people were actually have to sort of force themselves to make the time to do it. Wendy Turner Webster: Did the research show that it makes a big difference to read to your target? Dorothy Tomas: Yes very much so. Wendy Turner Webster: How important it is. Dorothy Tomas: Yes its. Wendy Turner Webster: I mean did it be common sense tells it is but what the survey show. Dorothy Tomas: The survey self reveal the statistics I have just discussed with you but some on the back of that has been a lots of research, which the survey toped into done by organizations such as the national literary trust and also the government itself and is early is strategy you know how we should be helping pre-Schooler's to learn as discovered the reading to little ones who children who are under 4 or 5 years old actually helps them to learn to concentrate until listen and those two skills are some of the most valuable once so they can take into the class room with them and a child that hasn't been read to when they are tiny finds it much more difficult to concentrate, when they get into reception class and so they start losing out before they've even had a chance to you know pick up a book may be and that's why it is so important to make sure that it becomes a habit. Wendy Turner Webster: Yeah, I think the other positive think and it is well just going from my own experience as a parent, who really religiously every night does read sometimes read more than other nights you know time constraints what happens but I will always do it, it's a really nice sort of ten minutes or 15 minutes that you are creating your children it's a quiet movement they will hanging on your very word there is no other destructions as we talk -- bed and I think they must surely be a positive angle on them as well. Dorothy Tomas: Absolutely that's having that relationship with your child were you are sharing something lovely together you is know is very, very special and your child will listen most to you as you know their parent so whatever you assigned then what you are telling them they are going to absorb that better from you than from any one else. Wendy Turner Webst

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