The Effectiveness of Antidepressant Studies Video

Dr. Low Dog discusses the soundness of antidepressant studies.
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Dr. Tieraona Low Dog: I'm Tieraona Low Dog. I'm a medical Doctor and I'm the Director of the Fellowship in Integrated Medicine here at the program in Integrated Medicine at University of Arizona. I'm also the Chair of the United States Pharamacomputer Dietary Supplements and Expert Committee. How effective are Antidepressant Studies? Dr. Tieraona Low Dog: We know the studies on Antidepressants have really kind of been a mixed bag. This year in January 2008, there were two studies that were published; one is the Canadian Medical Journal and the other New England Journal of Medicine that looked at all of the published and unpublished studies. In the New England Journal, in their review, there were 74FDA studies that had been conducted on Antidepressants. When you looked at the published trails, it made it look as if 94% of all studies that were done, show they were better than Placebo. However, when you added in the studies that were not published, only 51% of the studies show that they were better than Placebo. In the review that was done by the Canadian Medical Association, they looked only at Paroxetine in moderately to moderately severely depressed patients. And what they found was when you looked at the published and unpublished studies there was actually no more effectiveness than Placebo than Paroxetine. Now, I'm not saying that Antidepressants don't work, what I'm saying is that there maybe some real publication by us that we're seeing where pharmaceutical companies are primarily publishing the positive results and not publishing the negative ones. That really distorts than how effective these may be -- they may be less effective than what we've though before especially in particular populations, and that's concerning, so there has been a lot of attention on this slightly, and so I'd say they're right now, yes, Antidepressants are affective for some patients, they may not be overall as effective as we've been lead to believe by the published studies.

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