Learn how global warming contributes to an increase in kidney stones in this medical report.
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Allison Chow: For insidermedicinein60, I'm Allison Chow Queens University from Texas. According to research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, global warming may contribute to an increase in kidney stones. As a consequence of increased dehydration, kidney stone disease rates may increase by as much as 30% in some of the driest areas of the U.S. This could represent between 1.6 and 2.2 million cases by 2050 at a cost of one billion dollars to the economy. From Kansas, according to research published in Neurology, being physically fit may be beneficial for those with early Alzheimer's disease. In a study of 121 people, 57 of whom were suffering from early stages of Alzheimer's, researchers found that those who were less physically fit had four times more brain shrinkage compared to normal adults than those that were in better shape. Preserving brain volume may help prevent the loss of cognitive function. Finally, from Chicago, according to research in JAMA, less than a third of children are reaching recommended physical activity guidelines by the time they turn 15. Studies suggest that children require a minimum of 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise each day, but new research has shown that girls no longer attain this by the time they are 12.8 years of age, and boys by the time they are 14. Physical inactivity is associated with obesity and related illnesses and chronic diseases among young people. For Insidermedicinein60, I'm Allison Chow.

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