The Diversity of the Universe Part 2/2 Video

Meet Dr. Irfan Yilmaz, professor of Biology at Dokuz Eylul University, who attempts to combine his scientific studies with religious scholarship. Part 2/2.
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The Diversity of the Universe Part 2/2 Laura Wells: Some of the greatest beauty in the universe is found in its diversity. Take for instance the animal kingdom, a marvel of complexity in variation. Wherever an opportunity exists, there is a creature to take advantage of it. Giraffes with their long necks can eat leaves from the tallest of trees while tiny ants scavenge treasures of food larger animals fail to notice. There are millions of species on earth, each unique and wonderful in its own way. Large or small, fast or slow, terrifying or beautiful, together, they bring life and color to the masterpiece that is our world. Male1: For example, in the jungles of the Amazon, 100 kinds of insects can be found in a single tree. We have a rich population of living beings on earth. Eventhough each creature is different, when you examine anyone of them, they are complete in and off themselves with nothing missing. For instance, look at spiders. They are gorgeous. You see that each type is born with its own system of trapping prey. Each uses different mechanisms to catch food. If the spider were on its own to sit and think for hours, it wouldn’t be able to come up with anything better. Male2: Giraffes are the tallest land animals. Their long neck stretch out from their torsos like skyscrapers. Yet somehow, a giraffe maintains a healthy flow of blood throughout its body. Male1: When we take a look at anyone of these creatures, we see that their organs are prefect. Even with the best of our technology today, we can only produce the simplest imitations of these structures. Animals have very interesting organs. They are given the ideal organs for their survival. An animal is given one way to find its prey and another way to escape from hunters. Both the hunter and his core have weapons, but these weapons each work at a specific level but only to a certain degree. If not, then hunters would catch every animal they found and after sometime, the world would run out of animals. Male2: The sun maybe one of billions, if not trillions of stars, but it is our star, essential in many ways to life on earth. It produces not just the heat that keeps us warm but the energy that fuels the very processes of life. Its light feeds plants that in turn feed animals. And when animals die, their bodies decompose returning vital nutrients back to the earth. The cycle of life begins with the energy beam from the sun. The earth however, thrives only because of its location within the sun’s stream where the planet any closer to the sun or any further away, earth would be too hot or too cold and dark to sustain life as we know it. Male1: If there weren’t any sunlight, plants could use photosynthesis to make the nutrition they store as sugar. Herbivores wouldn’t have the plants to eat, and so carnivores wouldn’t have the herbivores to eat and would all die. When the carnivores were all gone, the creatures that would suppose to eat them would not get fed either. There would be no life on earth.

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