Testing for and Treating Scoliosis in Children Video

Pediatrician Dr. Jim Sears demonstrates how he tests for scoliosis while chiropractor Jennifer Jara adjusts Kailyn's back and explains other treatment options.
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Testing for and Treating Scoliosis in Children Dr. Jim Sears: In the pediatric office we usually screen for it as the kids are growing up and it’s actually pretty easy to test for, I’m going to show you. Kailyn I want you to stand up, pretend we’re in my office, we’re seating here listening to your heart-lungs and we say “Okay, now I’m going to check your back” so I’m going to let you stand up, I’m going to keep your knees straight, put your hands together like that and bend over that way and we’re just kind of look from behind and you can see if there’s any scoliosis going on. You’re going to see a pretty big difference in either the height of the shoulders or one of the side of the ribcages sticking out or even just a curve in the spine. Now you can get back up. Now then we would send you for an X- ray and depending on the curvature, often if it’s just mild traditionally, medically we’d say “Okay we’re just going to watch it you’re not bad enough for a brace or surgery yet” but sometimes chiropractors would have a different approach. Jennifer Jara: Let’s actually do an adjustment. Kailyn, if we could get you face down. Basically what we’re going to do is we’re just going to feel over the spine and hers pulls over to the right, Kailyn take a deep breath for me and all the way out. There you go, there we go. Good, now Kailyn if you could turn on your side towards me and she’s a pro with this, she’s done this a million times. Dr. Jim Sears: The one thing about this, sometimes it’s when a Doctor says “I know your child has a problem but we don’t need to do anything about it” parents can be frustrated and they’d rather be a little proactive and effectually had lot of patients seek out Chiropractor care for this type of this situation and do quite well. Jennifer Jara: Most of the scoliosis cases that we have about 80% of them are considered idiopathic which means that they’re unknown, we don’t know why but traditionally they say that it’s a two to six times more prominent in females than males and that’s it, it’s very safe and effective it’s a great adjunct to keeping active making sure she’s still playing softball, yoga, giving her some specific exercises. I’m also a big fan of Lasers, they have lasers in my office and I also give them Foot Orthotics if in case they have one leg that’s a little bit shorter than the other. Dr. Travis Stork: Thank you Jennifer. Jennifer Jara: Thank you very much.

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