Teaching Children About Nutrition Video

The Welch’s Harvest Grant Program is making a difference in communities across the country by teaching children the importance of healthy eating. Stick around for some great tips to get your child to eat healthy.
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Teaching Children About Nutrition Dr. Travis Stork: Living and looking and feeling your best often start with what you eat so parents listen up. How much do your kids really know about the food that they’re eating? Well, we recently paid a visit to the Cesar E. Chavez Science Magnet Elementary School to see first hand what kids are learning about healthy eating. Kids: Hey Doctors come and see our garden. Tricia Trevino-Woods: Here at Cesar E. Chavez Science Magnet School our school garden has really been a refuge for our students and a great learning environment. When I see the kids working in the garden I see their faces light up. It’s been so inspiring that Welch’s is a group of family farm owners who know the value of growing their food and where it comes from through the Welch's Harvest Grant Program. It’s spreading the message to kids and their families about the importance of eating healthy. Male: Strawberries. What I’ve learned nutrition is to eat right, be active and eat healthy. Tricia Trevino-Woods: We are just so excited that we were one of a hundred schools all across the United States that were chosen to receive the Welch's Harvest Grant. Female 2: The tomato doesn’t like a lot of nitrogen but the cabbage family does. Tricia Trevino-Woods: Gardening is a great way for students to learn healthy life long eating habits. Gardening provides a hands-on learning experience for the students because they’re provided with an area where they can observe, discover and experiment. This program means a lot to me because it gives me the opportunity to teach students the importance of eating the diverse variety of nutritious fruits and vegetables. Dr. Travis Stork: Joining us today from the Cesar E. Chavez Science Magnet Elementary is teacher Tricia Trevino-Woods as well as registered dietitian and author Carolyn O’Neil, welcome, welcome. Carolyn O’Neil: Thank you. Tricia Trevino-Woods: Thank you. Dr. Travis Stork: So I don’t think it’s a big mystery to everyone that kids and adults we don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables and what I always preach is about the rainbow of colors, so all of you or your kids eat are orange things. You’ve got to add dark, purples, blues, reds, greens, it’s all about both fruits and vegetables and all the colors of the rainbow. Dr. Jim Sears: Unfortunately, most of those deep dark colors are the ones that kids don’t like, like tomatoes and the red bell peppers and the zucchini and carrots but there are some— Carolyn O’Neil: And that what’s so great with the farming you know when they’re gardening because kids here when they get in there, you saw those kids in the video when they taste it they’re more out to try it if you’re planting them at home and of course, you’ve got to prepare it correctly, I think too. Dr. Jim Sears: Yeah, kids help shop and they grow with it, they’re going to be more likely to eat it but there are some alternatives, kind of some sneaky things you can do to get kids to try some of these stuff. First up, if they don’t know what’s in there. They may try it. This is actually a tomato sauce with pureed carrots mixed in there, put them on top with some whole wheat pasta. The kids will never know it that they’re eating they’re carrots or zucchini muffins. It looks like a muffin but it's got zucchini in there, or you can make it fun. I did this as a kid, red bell pepper boats with a little egg salad in there you know so that these are some great sneaky ways of getting kids to eat these stuff. Dr. Travis Stork: It’s not just vegetables Jim, it’s also fruits. Carolyn O’Neil: That’s right. Everybody at home has that -- the fruit bowl that sits in the kitchen and gathers dust. So you’ve got to be creative. You’ve got to do some really cool things and get a variety in there and so we have some reveal here. Dr. Jim Sears: Cool. Carolyn O’Neil: Some cool ideas with fruits. Now, this is great fruit sorbet. Dr. Jim Sears: That’s good. Caroly

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