In this video, Jane talks about the ups and downs of chemo.
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How have you handled your chemo treatments so far? Well, it’s an addition to everything else that goes on to life. It goes on in your life. It’s just more things you had to do, more places you have to be, more emotions you have to experience. So it’s taxing from that stand point, but I also know that the innocence is inside and I’ll get through this, and so you just cannot put it in there and go with and then do it. I think I was probably more nervous during the first one because I really expected that it would be worst than it was and I tried kind of gingerly. I was very careful afterwards I made sure I took my anti-nausea medications every three hours as often as I could take them, and I really didn’t do anything extra. I conserved my energy, try to get more rest, of course that was Christmas weekend. So it’s a little hard to do, but basically when I got through when I figured out it just really it wasn’t that bad. So that made go in for the second one and nobody is here, however the second one hit me a little bit harder and I had probably four to five days where I really didn’t feel as good or as perky or have this much energy, and as I had before so this is the third one I’m not sure kind of expecting it to be about what like the second one was but it’s good to see. It could be better, it could be worse. As a nurse and now a patient, has your perception of chemo changed? What I thought about chemo, I guess the thing that probably scared me the most is yes I would feel bad. All the time I would feel nausea, did all of the time. I dreaded that, I really, really didn’t want to do that, but it’s not that bad and so my initial thought about it really has changed. And that’s good, it means, a lot easier for me.

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