Learn how a local TV news anchor has taken her fight against cancer onto the TV screen.
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Surviving Breast Cancer Part 4/12 Host: Leslie was already a public figure when she found out she had breast cancer. The news anchor woman stepped out into the spotlight even further and discovered blessings. Leslie Mouton is still attracting attention two years after her breast cancer diagnosis because of the special way she found strength and courage. The Texas News anchor woman is telling her story to a local women’s group. Leslie Mouton: So I decided I would have a positive attitude. I would trust God and I would go forward and go public with my battle with breast cancer. Host: Leslie is used to going public but with the news, in her private life she treasures every moment with her 4-year old daughter Nicole. Leslie Mouton: You’re not allowed to turn five. No you’re not allowed to turn five. But I’m going to be so sad you’re growing too fast. Nicole: I mean six and seven. Host: Nicole was once worried but now here mom’s sparkle is back and so is her own. Leslie Mouton: I’m going to cry and cry and cry because you’re going to get old and grow up and who’s going to be my baby? Nicole: You’ll have a granddaughter. When I get a baby my baby will be your granddaughter. Leslie Mouton: And I will be so excited. As long as you’re married and out the college by then, okay. Host: Husband Tony is a fighter pilot who was prepared for war but not his wife’s breast cancer. Tony: I've been in two wars and during those I felt like I was in control to some extent. I knew what my capabilities were and I knew that I would be okay, but now when this was going on in her body I really had no control over it and that was more frightening to me than the being both the Gulf War or Kosovo and being shot at all the time. Leslie Mouton: Then we call this our third war. It was the war inside my body. Host: So how did Leslie face this war within her body when she learned she would battle a very aggressive form of cancer? A lumpectomy was the first step. Her family was waiting when she came out of surgery. Nicole: Well are you okay? Leslie Mouton: I’m okay I think I'm kind of groggy. Host: Now Leslie had to still herself for the next steps of treatment—radiation and chemotherapy. Female: Then this is the one that we discussed it late because it will cause you to lose hair. Leslie Mouton: I know how shallow it sound, and how vain it sounds but I flipped out when I found out my hair was going to fall out. I really did that was the first time I cried. Host: Two weeks after that first chemo treatment her hair began falling out in clumps. She worried about Nicole. Leslie Mouton: Having a bald mom would not be a normal thing for a two and a half year old, so it was important that I include her in the process and make it a fun event and not a frightening event. So we head over at my best friends, my family, we cooked dinner, had wine and we had a hair shaving party. Nicole: Two, three, four. Leslie Mouton: Nicole was the first one to cut one off. And then when the shaving came she was the first one to shave it stripe down my head. Nicole: I’m saving my mama’s hair. Leslie Mouton: She had a blast when it was over she said “Can we do it again tomorrow mommy?” and I said no it’s a one shot deal and then after I've got out of the chair my husband Tony sat the chair and shaved his head too. When my hair was gone I looked in the mirror and I screamed then looked again and I looked again and I realized it was still me and as I came to terms with the fact that I’m a beautiful person in here and that’s what matters most. I decided I was not going to hide behind my wigs and I told my news director when my chemo was over I was going to put it together and do series and tell people how I came to terms of losing my hair that the anchor one newscast fold. Jim Boyle: My mother died of breast cancer and I don’t ever think I told Leslie that but certainly when it’s happened in your family, to a love one you know that it’s an intense battle and usually it’s intensely privat

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