Learn about why screening for the superbug MRSA on admission resulted in little benefit in this medical report.
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Allison Chow: For insidermedicine in 60, I'm Allison Chow. From Geneva, in a study of over 20,000 surgical patients, screening for the superbug MRSA on admission resulted in little benefit while 5% tested positive for being a carrier, the rate of MRSA infections was no different in the group of patients who were screened for the bug versus the group who did not receive the test. With only 8% of all hospital acquired infections being related to MRSA, the best practices to lower all infections include frequent hand washing, effective antiseptic technique, and careful monitoring of IVs. From Arizona, a new CPR initiative emphasizing chest compression over breathing appears to improve the chances of survival if a cardiac arrest happens outside of hospital. A study of over 800 patients with cardiac arrest outside of hospital showed that while only 2% survived with traditional CPR, the number rose to 5% with the new technique, which consists of 200 consecutive chest compressions without breathing into the patient. And finally from Philadelphia, a study is showing that pharmaceuticals are showing up in the drinking water of many areas in the US. Commonly prescribed medicines, including sedatives and anti-inflammatories were found in 24 of 28 samples tested. The trace amounts are believed to be related to the fact that purification systems do not remove these compounds. For Insidermedicine in 60, I'm Allison Chow.

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