In this medical video learn how a tiny device is shocking hearts back into shape, and improving the health of patients with heart failure
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Jennifer Matthews: Looking after granddaughters Z and Miss Moochie keeps 45-year-old Milton Burt Shaw on his toes. But a failing heart robbed him of energy. Outings like a play date with the kids on the playground were more than he could handle. Milton Burt Shaw: Being home with kids was a job in itself. Jennifer Matthews: Things became even more complicated when Shaw's doctor told him he'd suffered heart attacks he wasn't even aware of. Milton Burt Shaw: I'm young, you know? I'm 41 years old, Shaw says. I'm a young man. It doesn't matter. Jennifer Matthews: The doctor says, there was only one more option. Milton Burt Shaw: He says, 'Look, Milton, look. There's nothing else physically that I can do for you. If you don't get this, chances are I cannot tell you how long your lifespan is going to be.' Jennifer Matthews: This was the Optimizer. It looks like a pacemaker or defibrillator, but works by delivering electrical energy, causing the heart to release more calcium, which builds up the muscle. Dr. Mark Wathen: This is the only therapy for the first time that has the ability to actually strengthen the myocyte, or the heart cell beating. Jennifer Matthews: Milton is only have the optimizer implanted for a month but already has a lot more energy. Milton Burt Shaw: I was feeling like I didn't know if I was going to live tomorrow or not. It gives you a new lease on life itself. Jennifer Matthews: And he hopes it will last long enough for him to watch his granddaughters grow up. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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