This health video focuses on the new treatments being adopted to help stroke victims be able to walk again.
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Biking is Carleen Gehling's passion. Put Carleen Gehling on a bike of any kind, and her face lights up. Biking is her passion. Carleen Gehling: I rode at least 30 miles every day and 50 and hundreds on the weekend, she recalls. Jennifer Matthews: That was 16 years ago, before her stroke. Today, her left arm has little movement. Carleen Gehling: It's been a lot of years of frustration not being able to do everything normally that I did before. Jennifer Matthews: But this new device is giving Gehling a hand. It's the NESS H200. Electrodes inside the device are programmed to electrically stimulate Carleen's hand and arm muscles to perform a task, like grasping. Dr. Stephen Page: What we're doing with this device is we have the patient practice functional activities, and we're sort of waking up the brain. We're telling the brain that the arm wants to be utilized in a functional way. University of Cincinnati, tells Ivanhoe. Jennifer Matthews: University of Cincinnati researcher Stephen Page says if the device works, he'll see a difference in patient MRIs. Dr. Stephen Page: If we do this repetitively over eight to 10 weeks, the brain actually rewires through a process called Neuroplasticity and starts sending signals down the arm again, and the patients get back function. Jennifer Matthews: For Carleen just moving her fingers again is amazing. Carleen Gehling: I haven't had that feeling for so many years. It's really neat. Jennifer Matthews: And, resuming distance riding some day would be icing on the cake. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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