This health video will focus on treatments to stop the spread of Cancer.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: These days Paul Lilling takes over kitchen duties for his wife, Irene. Irene was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1996. She was in remission for five years. But then, the cancer returned in her neck, lung and liver. Paul Lilling: It was disappointing, but from what I've read, that's not uncommon. Irene Lilling: I was in complete shock. I thought I was home free. Jennifer Matthews: Irene has her feet up because of the side effects she's experiencing from an experimental cancer drug, called Epothilone b. Doctor Edith Perez says while the drug is tough on patients, it's also tough on the cancer. Dr. Edith Perez: I think, based on the information we have so far, this is a promising therapy for patients with advanced breast cancer. Jennifer Matthews: The drug is particularly useful for patients who don't respond to commonly used breast cancer drugs. Dr. Edith Perez: It is critical that we continue our research to improve the lives of our patients, because we want people to live longer and to live better. Jennifer Matthews: The new treatment seems to be working for Irene. At last check, her tumors had shrunk. Irene Lilling: One doctor uses the word remission and I want to believe it, and I'm excited about that. Jennifer Matthews: For Irene, the side effects are worth it, if it means more time with her family. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement