This health video looks into new ways to help stops those who can't stop shopping.
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Ada Spade: Even when the brain was telling me, 'You don't need this. You don't need to go to the store.' The rest of the body was not cooperating. Jennifer Matthews: Ada Spade suffered from compulsive shopping -- a clinically diagnosed impulse control disorder. Ada Spade: We have over 5,000 books in my house, and we haven't even counted -- those are only three categories. Jennifer Matthews: She shopped every day -- some for 8 hours straight and spent up to $500 every week. Ada Spade: We tried therapy. We tried budgeting. We tried doing strictly cash. Everything we tried, it didn't last. Dr. Elias Aboujaoude: People's lives have been ruined. Their marriages have ended. They've had to declare bankruptcy. Jennifer Matthews: Now, Stanford Doctor Elias Aboudjaoude has something to help Ada and others like her. He tested the antidepressant Celexa on 24 patients. Dr. Elias Aboujaoude: We saw a response of 71 percent in terms of patients being able to function and not be so preoccupied with this drive to shop. Jennifer Matthews: Celexa increases serotonin levels in the brain. That simple boost could be all it takes. Dr. Elias Aboujaoude: I have seen it work miracles. I have seen it change people's lives. Jennifer Matthews: Ada says it's changed hers. Ada Spade: It's enjoyable now, but it's not a need now. Jennifer Matthews: And now, she can walk out of a store empty-handed. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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