Olympic bobsledder Steve Holcomb joins The Doctors to show off his Olympic gold.
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Steve Holcomb Joins the Doctors Dr. Travis Stork: Well, this surgery obviously got Steve his vision back but it also helped him to the US Bobsled team’s first gold medal in 62 years of the Vancouver Olympics. And you know what’s even cooler, Steve is here today. Everyone a warm welcome to Steve Holcomb. Thanks for coming. Steve Holcomb: Thank you. Dr. Travis Stork: Come on over here. So I had to confess, I’ve never shaken a hand of our US Olympic gold medalist before. Steve Holcomb: Well, thank you. Dr. Travis Stork: So do you stare that thing are all doing well? Steve Holcomb: Yes I pretty much carry it everywhere I go. I literally have it in my pocket all time. Dr. Travis Stork: You have back problems now -- Steve Holcomb: A little bit. Actually it’s just quite heavy. Dr. James Sears: I love that. That’s unbreakable. Dr. Travis Stork: That is real heavy. Dr. James Sears: I never touched one, can I -- whoa, that is cool. Dr. Andrew Ordon: And you will—come in with the scissors. Dr. James Sears: Yeah, I’ll just do like this. That’s awesome man. Dr. Travis Stork: So you know so much have changed for you since the surgery. Steve Holcomb: Yes, I mean it’s been a life changing now when winning a gold medal but I’ve been able to kind of get out of this bubble that I was living in kind of not being able to see more than 25 feet. Not to mention only like a year living this fear of this cornea transplant, it’s going to be coming along and it’s a painful procedure and taking out my sports so it’s been kind of life changing and overwhelming. Dr. Travis Stork: And you’re driving a bobsled with three of your buddies right behind you. Steve Holcomb: Pretty much yes so. Dr. Travis Stork: Why? Steve Holcomb: Yes, well they didn’t know that. Dr. James Sear: Maybe us three. Steve Holcomb: That’s not a problem. Dr. Andrew Ordon: We of course watched you on TV and it’s just doesn’t give a credit exactly how fast you’re going. It’s like watching race cars on TV. Steve Holcomb: Yes, it’s very different experience in person like watching on TV. It’s just like, it’s the same sled going down every time but when you get to experience the sled, 1400 pounds sled going 95 miles an hour, three feet from you. It’s been an interesting experience. It’s been a great ride. Dr. Travis Stork: He’s not only a gold medal but now apparently something else in his honor. Dr. Brian Boxer Wachler: As a result of all these inspiration what I decided to approach Steve with was to honor him by changing the name from C3-R to Holcomb C3-R in his honor and really he’s made the procedure world famous. Dr. Travis Stork: And now people know out there if they’ve suffered from the same condition that there’s hope. And that you could still follow your dreams and your passions and hey, maybe not everyone wins a gold medal. Steve Holcomb: You’ll never know. Dr. Travis Stork: You know what, you’ll never know if you set your mind to something. Dr. Andrew Ordon: How about 2014? Steve Holcomb: Definitely, yeah we’ve got to do defend that out. Dr. Travis Stork: There you go. Thank you so much. Steve Holcomb: Thank you for inviting me. Dr. Travis Stork: Dr. Brian Boxer Wachler thank you as well. Another round of applause for this Olympic gold medalist, thank you for coming on the show.

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