Starting Solid Foods Video

Martin D. Fried MD discusses when should babies start with solid foods.
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Male Speaker: A young baby which is formula fed we don't like to add solids before the four six months and we usually start up with the Rice or may be barley cereal. What would you use after cereal may be next food if you would give, what would be the one you try go to? Dr. Martin Fried: Usually go to fruit, I have them take one or two ounces make it last one to two to tree days to make sure the child is not allergic to that particular fruit and then after fruit is tolerated and you've try different fruits I usually go to vegetables. Male Speaker: Okay. So the trick is as the kid eats more solid food which is certain amount of calories, the kid probably naturally going to get a little less formula. Dr. Martin Fried: Yes, I what I usually tell them is not to increase the formula if they were 24 to 30 ounces I usually saying now just add in an ounce a day of fruits and work it work a way up to 2 ounces and 3 ounces and keep the formula. Male Speaker: So if the kid is gaining the same percentile, 50, 60 whatever the percentile is and stays with that percentile out of nowhere the kid starts to going from what say 50 percentile to 70 that's a big red flag. You get to figure out why, is that correct? Dr. Martin Fried: Yes. Male Speaker: A good pediatrician will review what the consumption is and make sure that it's based on calories and not a disease. Dr. Martin Fried: I sit down at each visitor and actually calculate how many calories they are taking and how many calories per kilo they are taking and... Male Speaker: What will be the recommend amount of calories per kilo for say a six-month old? Dr. Martin Fried: A 100 calories per kilo Male Speaker: And what about one year old? Dr. Martin Fried: 80 calories per kilo. Male Speaker: So it gets a little bit less Dr. Martin Fried: It was a 120 for the first six months of life, so goes from the 120 to 100 to 80 because you go from gaining a gram, not a gram I'm sorry an ounce a day is about the average weight gain in the first six months at least and than it goes to 20 grams and then a little bit less.

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