Sports Injury Research Video

Sports Injury Forum - Michael DeFranco MD, Guest:Paul Gubanich MD ,Team Physician, Cleveland Browns Football Team Director, Primary Care Sports Medicine Research, Cleveland Clinic.
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Sports Injury Research Interviewer: At the Cleveland Clinic, you are the Director of Sports Medicine Research, can you tell us in the research that you have done; have you found things that have helped you changed the way that you prepare athletes for their sport? Interviewee: Yes, I think we certainly have in several different areas. For instance, you mentioned concoction in it being in the news and I think as we look at this more, we see that again, not all injuries are the same and the individual that actually get concoct may change our recommendations for every turn to play in how aggressively we are, how fast we pursued at. Obviously, no athlete that is symptomatic should return back to play when they remain symptomatic but we also know that certain athletes may be at higher risk for having more prolonged symptoms or a higher risk for concoction in general. For instance, we do some of our analysis of our neuropsych data. We were able to see that athletes that have history of learning disability or ADHD may be at higher risk for concoction compared to those athletes without those conditions so that they're certainly maybe a role to being a little bit more cautious in those groups of athletes. We have also seen that there are groups doing jump training programs. We are, as well as other groups around the country as methods of trying to prevent ACL injuries. Then we have groups that are currently studying how effective these measures are here at the clinic. We are even doing a study with biomarkers looking at concoction to see if that may be helpful for returning athletes to play. Basically, we’re running a blood test to see if there is an injury marker that we can use to help us guide us in terms of return to play or concoction, sort of like a troponin test when someone has a heart attack, there the heart leak some enzymes that they can check in the blood to show that they’ve had an injury to their heart. We believe that there are similar markers that occur in the brain that we might be able to find and help guide those return to play if that is in the evaluations.

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