This medicinal video looks into methods of spinal correction.
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Jennifer Mathews: Darlene Holloway had a tougher time in high school than many of her peers, but it wasn't because of her grades. Darlene Holloway: It was just extremely painful to walk. Jennifer Mathews: She had a spinal condition called Spondyloptosis. Darlene Holloway: The only way I could, describe is that my ribcage was sitting on top of my pelvis. Jennifer Mathews: It's a severe deformity this father-son team of surgeons says is difficult to correct with standard surgeries. Charles Edwards: This leave the patient with a residual deformity, which may result in not only a limited cosmetic result, but also a higher risk that they're going to have continue problems with their back. Jennifer Mathews: Doctor Charles Edwards pioneered a detailed surgery to fix the deformity. Charles Edwards: It takes a great deal of patience to do this procedure. Jennifer Mathews: In a surgery that takes about ten hours, Doctor Edwards uses these tools to stretch the ligaments, and pull the spine upright. He also stretches the nerves. Charles Edwards: I found that to a remarkable extent, they can accommodate several inches of lengthening. Jennifer Mathews: He compares the surgery to the eastern philosophy of gardening. Charles Edwards: I see the same ropes and stakes pushing trees to create the shapes the gardener wants. Jennifer Mathews: This is Darlene's spine before surgery. Here it is, today. Darlene Holloway: It added some inches of course to me, and it also relieved the pain. Jennifer Mathews: At 29, this college student says she doesn't even notice the hardware in her back. This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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