Henry Joseph Hasson - Pediatric Neurologist, talks about Speech Development in Children
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Male Speaker 1: A year of age you can expect your kid to say how many words? Male Speaker 2: Well, by a year of age, children should be having that first few words, when you say languages not only necessarily words. Male Speaker 1: Most often. Male Speaker 2: For example -- well not only that, for example, pointing is really you know, one of first language that we see that in children to know point for what they want even before they are able to say words. Male Speaker 1: So we put that expressive language of the children? Male Speaker 2: Sure, now these are quiet expressive language. And even babbling and cooing is, you know, the first starting of expressive language and as using the hands is easier than controlling all the muscles in the mouth that it takes it say certain sounds and words. You can see children using their hands and gesturing as expressive language even before using their words. Male Speaker 1: If a kid is 4 months of age, was they make an eye contact, isn’t a little bit of concern? Male Speaker 2: Sure, it’s definitely by 4 months baby should be at least with their mother, with the people they are used to, should be making eye contact and then it should be following specifically something that’s they are interested in. Male Speaker 1: About social smile, because there is no social smile, is that a little bit of concern? Male Speaker 2: Sure, that will be concerning. Male Speaker 1: What would that -- what would you expect the social smile to – it should be there in most babies. Male Speaker 2: It’s early on, I mean, they really start smile at one, two month of age, they’ll go -- they’ll start not responding to their mother and being consoled by their mother. Male Speaker 1: So that was – I think kid, say 15 to 18 months, and it’s really not expressively, if it like by pointing direction or with words that’s sort like another big red flag sometimes. Male Speaker 2: Yeah, that’s definitely a red flag and there’s all sorts of disorders that are associating with expressive language disorders by expressive mean what they are saying that is supposed to reset that whether understanding language and you know it varies. Male Speaker 1: Okay. But of course if you don’t think the kid was speaking, they are always -- especially kid had a hearing test. Male Speaker 2: It’s always the first thing to do. They -- with a newborn hear and scream at them when they first point but of course that’s not very accurate, that’s helpful but if your child is not speaking, the first thing you do is check the hearing, so that’s something that could be taken care of. Male Speaker 1: Okay, there are ways of joining at reasonably accurate as kids gets older Male Speaker 2: Sure. Male Speaker 1: But they should not just speak out to anybody, it should be someone specially trained in doing that with kids. Male Speaker 2: Yes, of course. Male Speaker 1: Some of they are placed in observation stil get today. Male Speaker 2: Right, I mean some parents will come and say, oh, of course, my child here is -- I can tell that they hear but that you know, hearing is very specific in its different frequencies that some babies can hear out in different frequencies that human language is functioning at in, and therefore all those frequencies need to be tested properly. Male Speaker 1: So if a kid doesn’t have a social smile or doesn’t speak, people are really worried about their children today, what’s called autism. Male Speaker 2: Right. Male Speaker 1: Now you don’t likely put that diagnose in a kid in a young age but you think about it a little bit if a kid, they doesn’t have a social smile or doesn’t speak but we don’t say the kid is -- just we have concerns. Male Speaker 2: Right, early on to make the diagnosis however if you started seeing that they don’t have language and they don’t have sociability and they are not interacting properly, it’s something that you definitely want to keep in the back of your minds that you can keep following the

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