A group of dads talks about their experiences on sleep deprivation after their babies were born.
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Damion Queva: I think as having two children, one; two and a half year-old daughter and a 12 year-old daughter, I remember mostly more than anything else, the sleep deprivation I went through. I think it's mostly because the interruption of sleep during the night, the first time bring out the excitement, the fact that my wife was tired, so I had to jump up to do the bottle feeds sometimes. Anytime we heard a murmur, is she still breathing, I mean that type of thing. For two weeks, my work have given my off before I had to go back to work. I just remember this feeling just like anytime I could grab five, you know, 50 wings or whatever occasionally. Chris Brooks: Yeah. Damion Queva: I would take it. I'd never felt so tired in my life and I used to party hard. So I should have been quite used to it, don't necessarily going through the likes, I was - Chris Brooks: I suppose when you party there you don't get to out sleep and then waking up again and then off to sleep again like, it's torture only. Jonathan Wills: I did an almost a reverse because when our first one came, first two weeks, no problem, perfect baby, no problems. Then it kicked in after than. That's when I realized. Kevin Day: You're going to kill me as I think I was quite lucky. First three nights, mostly -- mainly shock and fear because he got his tidy little thing. Damion Queva: Exactly. Kevin Day: You don't feel qualified to look after. But then after that, because I am a standup comedian, my body clocks target anyway, so I started sleep too late in night the most part. Because Ally was breastfeeding, because the baby was -- she was -- didn't really see the need to wake me up unless she needed something. So for the most part, even if he was awake, she didn't tend to bother me, which is fantastic. I mean I would have happily go up to because there isn't a lot I can do because I'll just sit watch the back of his head, what he is feeding or going through a magazine, but it's not quite a -- because you're not going to have conversations at 4 o'clock in the morning. Chris Brooks: We can't breastfed as well. My wife and I found I quite guilty about that because when they breast-feed, it's like, you say, you can't do anything apart from sit and watch. Kevin Day: I thank my lucky stars. Chris Brooks: Yeah. Kevin Day: Unless you -- but I did feel -- I mean in terms of bonding with the baby, I didn't think it helps. For three years, I was touring as well so there's a lot -- even when I was in tours, I only saw the back of his head, so they kind of -- it was -- I was sleeping politically but it was at the expense of not really bonding for the first three year. Jonathan Wills: Did you find this well because it reminds back through quite similar that we have presented. Did you find that it's actually affecting your performance as well because that's the thing that I found, actually I was looking physically absolutely right, I mean as you are on radios. Speaker: -- Kevin Day: I wasn't too bad because I've always kept regular hours anyway. Jonathan Wills: Yeah. Kevin Day: I've never - I can't remember the last time, probably in the age of 24-28, last I am got eight hours proper sleep anyway, proper times up. As always I was getting up, getting in late, and getting up late or just not sleeping brilliantly anyway. So I didn't really had my sleep that interrupted by the baby. You kind of - I think the difference is you never fully sleep once you've got the baby there, you've never fully sleep, you always - some part of you is always is alert in case something happens, the slightest change in the breathing pattern is there, so I think you never sleep as deeply again. But I was certainly getting as much sleep, I mean the quality of sleep wasn't there. I think I was the luckiest amongst you and that deprivation wasn't a massive problem for me. Damion Queva: I just remember my wife couldn't - wasn't so bothered about she is quite exhausted so it's my job to sort of pick up the baby w

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