Sleep Deprivation in New Moms Video

A group of mothers discuss about sleep deprivation when nursing their babies.
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Rachel Royce: Sleep deprivation started with me, when I was actually in hospital. When I had my second child, he unfortunately had to go in Intensive Care. And I thought great, I will get some sleep, which is horrible, but not really. I mean, he was born a bit early, so they put him in an incubator. He was fine. I felt great, I will get some sleep. But then I didn't realize, they had put me in a shared room, and the other women's baby was crying whole night, and by the second night I was so fed up, I stopped at the corridor of this hospital, going to nurse, just find me a cupboard, I want to sleep, I was desperate. I think it's a worse thing, isn't it? Cheryl Baker: I have twins -- with mine, I was thinking, well it would be fine, because they will both wake up at the same time, and I will feed them at the same time and then they go to sleep at the same time. And didn't do any of that. Ingrid Tarrant: They were completely out of sync. Cheryl Baker: Oh! Yeah. completely. Ingrid Tarrant: And couldn't you try and get them into sink though, keep one up longer and wake one up earlier. Cheryl Baker: I tried, but they have their own idea of when they want to wake up. And Steve, God Bless him, my husband, he was good. He was good. But it was, I had to breastfeed one and then he would do the other one with a bottle, but imagine -- do you find this, man can sleep through by a baby, they don't hear it. Ingrid Tarrant: But I think it's a selective hearing, isn't it? I mean, I can sleep through he puts his alarm, but my alarm will wake me up, because it's not important. I don't need to do that. So, when they know that you are the one that's going to get up and whatever, they can switch off, and equally you could. If they said, if you are bottle feeding and he said, I will do the feeds tonight and everything, you would not wake up. Mara Lee: Oh! I don't know, because I used to wake up when used to I hear my kids' dummies drop. And then in the next few minutes, he just did -- and I figured out. I have been getting -- I became such a light sleeper and I think that was just awful. Female Speaker: But how long for? In sort of very early days you are to wake up that drop and stuff. Mara Lee: Well, I guess, I mean, but I think at that point when you are worried about it, you also so fatigued that you do conquer that, I mean, I think for a good year after each of my kids was born. Rachel Royce: And how did it effect you, did you get really irritable? Mara Lee: I felt like I would never sleep again. And I had that awful feeling of why didn't anyone tell me -- that generic -- sleep goes out the window, I didn't realize that it meant, that every two hours, or every half an hour or every -- Cheryl Baker: You just don't know. Mara Lee: That there is no block of sleep that you ever get to repay for all of those nocturnal -- Ingrid Tarrant: But did you not find while you were pregnant, that your body was preparing for sleep deprivation because I did, because I wasn't sleeping as well. So by the time the babies were born, or baby, I only had one at a time, not like you. But again, I was kind of prepared, because I haven't been sleeping well. Obviously you have got this great big bump and you are waking up. You can't get comfortable so you are almost getting to that sort of mode that you are compensating a little bit, that when you have your child, it's not such a shock, I didn't find it such a huge shock at all. Mara Lee: To a degree, but I think that the killer is, that there is no point at which the kids go home, back to their real parents. Imagine they are out there, somewhere knowing what to do with them, you don't have that thing where, you can just pop them away and then just recoup and get that big block of sleep and I think, yes it prepares and you have got, you are going to the loo every three hours when you are pregnant, but when the baby arrives there is just no time that you can actually reclaim for yourself. Ingrid Tarrant: There is, w

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