Skin Cancer Cream Video

This medical video looks into the use of using the skin Cancer cream.
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Jennifer Matthews: Despite a kidney transplant, 6th-grader Vallie Hardaman keeps step with her classmates. But before she joins them on the playground, she has to take an extra step. Vallie Hardaman: I put sunscreen on; she makes me. Jennifer Matthews: Anti-rejection drugs have weakened Vallie's immune system and put her at higher risk for skin cancer. After one year on the drugs, her risk for skin cancer has increased by seven percent. After 20 years, it will increase by 70 percent. Dr. Craig Elmets: So, this is why we especially want to find something that can prevent skin cancer in the these patients. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Craig Elmets is testing a cream called dimericine. He hopes it will repair sun-damaged DNA, which can cause mutations and ultimately skin cancer. Doctor Elmets says if the cream works for transplant patients, it could work for everyone. Dr. Craig Elmets: It would be nice if people could use this and provide additional ways of protecting against skin cancer, because sunscreens, although they're effective, certainly are not complete. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Elmets says the experimental cream will not replace sunscreen. But since Vallie's mom won't always be standing guard, it does add an extra line of defense. Linda Gunter: You've done all the hard work until this point, you want things to be easier, so this is one of those things that will make it easier. Jennifer Matthews: Today, that added protection eases Vallie's mind. And in the future, it could ease all of ours. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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