A mother who lost her child to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome now educates parents on ways to help prevent SIDS.
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Julie: Hi everybody, I'm Julie Claire and you're watching Parents TV. It is every parent’s worse nightmare sudden infant death syndrome and it kills more babies age one month to one year than any other illness. SIDS strikes with no warning. There is no cause and no cure but there are things you can do to reduce the risk for your baby. Parents TV’s Katie Zackary will show us the measures of keeping more babies alive. Katie: There are no symptoms or signs, no way parents can know their baby will never wake up. Loosing a child profoundly changed who I was and really fundamentally changed what was important in my life. Allyson Rose lost her first son Conner to SIDS. Allyson: It does not discriminate and that’s the thing, it can happen to anyone at any time. Katie: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome occurs when a healthy baby unexpectedly dies and doctors cannot find a medical reason behind it. It claims the life of thousands of infants every year and turns parents like Rose into mission driven mom. Allyson: At the side, not the stomach, back to sleep is best. Katie: SIDS is often called crib death. Research shows putting a baby under a year old on their back to sleep greatly reduces the risk for SIDS. There are more boys of all victims than girls. And more SIDS deaths are reported in the fall and winter months possibly because of overheating. Allyson: Experts say keep stuffed animals out of the crib when the baby is sleeping and never over bundle your baby or keep the room too hot. Katie: Rose and her husband Kenny say they follow these rules as closely with each of their next three children as they did with Conner. She knows there is nothing she could’ve done to save Conner and she tries to tell other SIDS parents that. The couple now runs a baby proofing business. They educate parents in New York and Connecticut about the dangers children face at home from infant to much older. Allyson: I mean this is more than a job, this is our passion and we needed to do this. This was our calling. Katie: For Parents TV, I'm Katie Zachary. Julie: The national institute of child health and human development sponsors the back to sleep campaign which encourages parents of healthy babies to put them to sleep on their backs. Since the campaign began in the mid 90s, the number of SIDS babies has been cut in half. Thanks for watching Parents TV, your source for the best information for your growing family.

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