Sherri Shepherd Shares Some Diabetic Stories Video

Sherri Shepherd Shares Some Diabetic Stories.
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How Not to Get Diabetes Todd Hartley: Did you know that if your mother, father, sister or brother has heart disease or diabetes your risk of developing diabetes goes way, way up? Well Sherri Shepherd from the hit morning show “The View” well she knows all about how family history affects diabetes, but she had to find out the hard way. You see, Sherri’s mom passed away at a young age, the young age of 41 and because the apple doesn’t fall far from the diabetic family tree, Sherri grew up and eventually became a diabetic. To share her story and lessons learned, “The View” Sherri Shepherd joins me right now on EmpowHER. Hi, Sherri. Sherri Shepherd: Hi, how are you Todd? Good to talk to you. Todd Hartley: Sherri, it’s an honor to talk with you. Your big discussion topic in my family, my mom every morning, while having breakfast, watches “The View” and it’s a real treat to get to talk with you. Can you talk with me about your oldest memories that surround diabetes? Sherri Shepherd: Oh wow! My oldest memories of diabetes is people in my family who were diabetic, who have, I had an aunt that was blind, I knew people on the block who had had amputations. But, knowing that it’s, even still with them having diabetes and in my family we didn’t call it diabetes, we called it “the sugar” and knowing that they had “the sugar,” they would still come up to the table and get, you know, sweet potatoes and pies and cakes, and macaroni and cheese and we just thought it was normal. We just went, “Oh, you know, they got ‘the sugar’.” And eventually somebody would get an amputation or you know, like in my mother’s case at 41, passed away, you know, and nobody really did anything about it. We just went on life as normal. Todd Hartley: I have an unbelievable sweet tooth craving and the only way that I can keep it under control is that if I just let it know who’s boss. In your book, “Permission Slips: Every Woman’s Guide to Giving Herself a Break,” it’s really, really funny. Great read. You wrote, “Diabetes was the only thing that kept me sane for a while. I was experiencing stress that brought me to my knees and prayer and agony nearly everyday. In fact, if I didn’t have diabetes I would weigh almost 400 pounds right now.” Sherri Shepherd: Yeah. Todd Hartley: Can you talk with me about how diabetes, you know, in a bizarre way, as it may sound, how diabetes kept you sane? Sherri Shepherd: You know why? Because having diabetes every single day I have to make a choice and look at what I am putting in my mouth, because everything that I put in my mouth affects my body. And if I did not have diabetes as a safeguard, because I also write in my book that everybody from my church always wants to go and go. I am going to pray that God takes it away, and I say, “No, please don’t pray that. Diabetes is something that really helps me keep eating healthy food. Diabetes is something that keeps me exercising.” So, I say that to say if I didn’t have it, I probably would be going to a fast food restaurant ordering a number six super size right now. Todd Hartley: Sure. Sherri Shepherd: But I know that because I have diabetes it’s so important for me to eat right and maintain a healthy lifestyle because I got a little boy who is four years old, who looks at me and he expects his mother have some sense, you know? And he doesn’t know anything about diabetes. He just knows he wants his mommy to hug him, feed him and put him to bed at night. Todd Hartley: Yeah, that’s a big responsibility. You also wrote in your book that “diabetes forced me to see food as fuel, which is no fun.” How is food and exercise decisions changed how you take care of your health? Sherri Shepherd: Well, I tell you what. You know, one of the things I used to eat before I got the diagnosis of diabetes was, I don’t know how you are as a man, but, you know women, we are very emotional and when I went through anything emotional, a big bowl of pasta and a fork was all I needed to get through the night. Th

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