Self Avocation For Sexual Dysfunction Video

Dr. Friedman tells a woman how to advocate for herself at the doctor's office if she thinks she has a sexual function due to menopause.
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A woman may be concerned about her sexual dysfunction, not know really how to address it with her doctor’s office. And as I stated before, sexual dysfunction is quite common, somewhere abut 40% of women in ages, probably 20 to 50 have some type of sexual dysfunction, yet most doctors don’t know what to ask about it or too busy to ask about. Well, it’s a really important issue. Also, I remember back on my medical school days, I didn’t get ay training in sexual function. I didn’t learn about its importance or how do you even approach this topic. So I think may doctors, either they are not interested in discussing it with their patient or they just don’t have the expertise to discuss it. So I think as a patient, what you have to do is you have to bring it up and say, “Doctor, by the way, I want to talk to you about my sexual dysfunction.” And say, “Last year or so, maybe I haven’t had any orgasms, I'm not used,” or, “My interest in sex is below,” and then the doctor and you can export together, “Is this due to some hormonal issue.” Again, whether it’s around your menopause. It might be more likely that it’s a hormonal issue. You know, if you found out your husband is having affair on you, maybe that’s the reason why you’re not interested in sex with him because of some more social or psychological reason. So I think it’s up to the patient and the doctor discuss this thoroughly and there is no one size fits all. For one patient, it may be due to hormonal, for one patient, it maybe completely psychological or social, you know, or maybe they have a new baby in the house and you’re not getting any sleeps. So, that’s the cause of it, but it needs to explored and it maybe a combination of the factors.

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