This medical video shows how scorpions can be used to help stop cancer.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: Meet the Israeli Yellow Scorpion. It's not deadly, but it's sting is painful. 24-Year-old Duane Rualo and his brother are hoping it will save Duane from brain cancer. Duane Rualo: It's one of the worst kinds of cancers you can have, because there's still no treatment. Jennifer Matthews: Duane has a malignant glioma, a brain tumor that kills 98% of those who get it. After surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy failed, Duane learned of a new treatment using scorpion venom. Adam Mamelak: I'm hopeful that it's a step in the right direction. Jennifer Matthews: Doctors at City of Hope Medical Center inject a copy of the toxin directly into the brains of patients just before radiation. The toxin doesn't kill tumor cells, but it does cling to them. Adam Mamelak: So by attaching, radioactivity, which we know can kill the cells, to the toxin, the toxin then can bind the cell, then radioactivity itself can do the cell killing. Jennifer Matthews: Duane was the first patient to receive the treatment. Although he also had a second surgery, he believes it was the toxin that saved him. Duane Rualo: If I didn't have this, apparently I only had three months to live at the most, and I'm still here after about seven months. Jennifer Matthews: Doctors are more cautious. Adam Mamelak: Certainly we're hopeful that the treatment had something to do with it, but it's far too early in the trial to really make those kinds of statements. Jennifer Matthews: Until they know for sure, Duane is holding onto hope. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement