In this medical video learn how our voice is something most of us take for granted, but some people are living unable to talk.
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Jennifer Matthews: Odalys Arriete knows teaching is her calling. Odalys Arriete: I definitely wanted to be a teacher for as long as I can remember. Jennifer Matthews: But her career nearly came to a halt two years ago when she had a cyst removed from her thyroid. Odalys Arriete: I mean I was just like my eyes welled up and I just felt like completely drained. I had no idea that could have happened. Jennifer Matthews: The surgery damaged a vocal cord and left Odalys without a teacher's most valuable tool, her voice. Odalys Arriete: It was very physically exhausting and emotionally draining because all of a sudden you felt a little invisible. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Roy Casiano says vocal cord paralysis can leave patients panicky. Roy Casiano: They are considerably desperate. They cannot go back to work because nobody understands them. The family does not understand them. Jennifer Matthews: But a material called Radiesse is giving patients their voices back. Roy Casiano: It increases the bulk of the vocal cord where you have lost muscle. It fills that space. Jennifer Matthews: It's injected into vocal cord and significantly helps more than 80 percent of patients. Here is our Odalys's vocal cord before treatment, here they are after, tugging and working again. Odalys went eight months with nothing more than a whisper. Today, she's back in the classroom. Odalys Arriete: I still have a little raspiness, but boy, compared to what I sounded like, I feel like a new person really. It's wonderful. Jennifer Matthews: And she doesn't need to worry about losing her voice again. Doctor Radiesse is a life-long fix. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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