This medical video focuses on how rotationplasty helps save limbs, which may have to have been amputated otherwise.
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Jennifer Matthews: Jenna Keen is a very active 13-year-old. Jenna Keen: I can do cheerleading. I do gymnastics. I like to dance. Jennifer Matthews: And she does it with one leg. Jenna Keen: I remember like my mom getting a phone call, and she got all upset, and that's when we found out I had cancer. Jennifer Matthews: At age 4, Jenna was diagnosed with Ewing's Sarcoma in her leg, a childhood type of bone cancer. Instead of a complete amputation, doctors at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were able to save part of Jenna's leg with Rotationplasty. In this procedure, the lower portion of the leg is rotated 180 degrees and reattached as the upper part. Dr. John Dormans: With the Rotationplasty, the old ankle becomes the new knee joint, so a patient is able to run and jump and participate in activities without fear of having to worry about breaking or loosening an artificial bone or joint. So when Jenna bends her knee or flexes the knee she is actually bringing the ankle joint up. Jennifer Matthews: Jenna is not self-conscious anymore, but she remembers being nervous about showing her friends. Jenna Keen: I pulled my pant up, and I was like; I explained to them how I had cancer. And they were like that's cool! I wish I could take my leg off. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Dormans says the risk of recurrence with Rotationplasty compared to full amputations is the same. Jenna remains cancer free and free to do any activity she wants. That gives her something to cheer about. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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