Su Laurent brings us handy hints and tips to make life easier, like what's the best room temperature for a baby.
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Catrina Skepper: Once again, it’s time to go through mail bag and answer your medical questions. Today Su Laurent, a Consultant Paediatrician from Barnet Hospital is with me. Welcome again Su. Su Laurent: Hi Catrina. Catrina Skepper: Obviously at this of the year, when it gets cold, parents are worried I think a lot about the temperature of the room, temperature that they keep their baby, the environment of the room. What do you suggest, if you have the heating on at night? Could you be in danger of overheating your baby? Su Laurent: Yes, and if -- I don’t recommend keeping heating on at night I think unless it is an exceptionally cold night and you are feeling very cold yourself, then don’t, just make sure baby is wrapped in a couple of layers. In fact, these baby Grobags are rather good. Catrina Skepper: Fantastic. Su Laurent: I really recommend them because kids can’t escape from them and they also can’t get smothered by them. And they’re usually -- if you read the number of tucks, you can get a winter one and a summer of one. I think they are the best thing. The temperature should be about the temperature that feels comfortable for you. Catrina Skepper: Because, I am somebody who always feels cold, so I tend to kind of put more layers on, but at the same time when I’m going to my child’s room, I sort of think, gosh it feels – I always have the window open. But should you be worried about drawls and things because of -- Su Laurent: I mean, I think if you got a normal healthy term baby, that is absolutely fine to keep the temperature how it feels comfortable for you, obviously not drafty but just a right sort of ambient temperature that you feel comfortable in. Some people buy a little baby momentos to keep in their room if they are not sure. Catrina Skepper: But then you are firmly anxiously because you will check it once you got -- Su Laurent: You are right. And I’d never had a baby the momenta. So if you put a baby who’s a bit from premature, then you – it’ll be advised by the neonatal unit where the baby was, at what temperature to keep it in and you’ll notice the babies in the neonatal unit are kept rather warmer. Catrina Skepper: Yeah, I remember very well, mine screaming apparently when he was removed from the light in the neonatal unit, he wanted to be kept warm, which is I think an individual thing, so you have go by a baby sweating as a very unnatural thing, they don’t sweat. Su Laurent: They don’t usually sweat, not young babies. Catrina Skepper: Through the head. Su Laurent: Exactly. And actually an interesting point I got is it in New Zealand with a -- there are a lot of cot death in New Zealand, lot of research into cot death. And if you look at North Island and South Island, they found that in South Island, there were a lot more cot death than the North Island. Then they looked again and saw that people kept the nursery much hotter in South Island, because it’s a cold Island and people feel it is cold outside, they was overconfident. Catrina Skepper: Concentrating? Su Laurent: So the babies that were kept in a too hot environment were the ones who are more likely to die of cot death, and that’s a very tale that we’ve learned from New Zealand. Catrina Skepper: Very important. Also in terms of bedding, what if you -- obviously if you use a sleeping bag or the baby grobag, that’s one thing but swaddling babies is a very fashionable thing to do, it’s also very comforting, we are talking about obviously very young babies now. And in the layers of swaddling, should you always kept it cotton or do you have blanket if it’s colder then -- Su Laurent: Yes, it’s very easy to overwrap a baby and to sort -- to take a blanket for example, folded over a few times and put it on the baby or wrap him round and round and round, and in fact, you can quickly overheat a baby that way. So although swaddling can be helpful just to calm a baby down, in fact mostly we don’t recommend swaddling them for them to go to sleep nowadays. C

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