This medical video focuses on the use of using robots in the rehab of stroke patients.
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Jennifer Matthews: Bill Journey spent his life running. He ran his first Chicago Marathon in 1974. Bill Journey: I ran it in two hours and 38 minutes and four seconds. Jennifer Matthews: Then, 12 years ago, Bill had a stroke. Bill Journey: I said, you got to be kidding. How did I have a stroke? I just got through running this morning, and you're talking about a stroke? Jennifer Matthews: With his right side paralyzed, Bill grew dependent on a cane. Bill Journey: I'm so skeptical about falling, falling, falling. Jennifer Matthews: Then, two years ago Bill met a robot called KineAssist. Dr. Elliot Roth: The KineAssist does a lot of what you might call the dirty work or the heavy work. Jennifer Matthews: Therapists used to hold patients up, but now the robot does that. It helps improve walking and balance. Dr. David Brown: If they lose their balance or fall over to the side, the device will catch them and will hold them up in a straight position. Jennifer Matthews: That feature lets Bill move in ways he couldn't before. He even plays catch with his therapist while standing on foam. If he loses his balance, he's in safe hands. The robot's sensors detect Bill's movements, so it can move with him. The machine weighs 500 pounds, but Bill only feels the weight of his body. Dr. David Brown: It gives him more freedom, more independence in his movements. Jennifer Matthews: After using a cane for a decade, Bill is finally able to walk without it, after just three weeks with the KineAssist. Bill Journey: It helped me a lot ... a whole lot. Jennifer Matthews: Now, even in a strong Chicago wind, Bill is confident he'll stay on his feet. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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