Ray, 54, sends a video to OB/GYN Dr. Lisa Masterson, requesting help for coping with his wife, Christa’s, PMS.
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Reversing PMS Symptoms Ray: This is Ray, its 2 A.M. It’s PMS time again with Christa and I don’t just don’t know what else to do. It’s crazy. The best thing I could compare it to is the movie, The Exorcist. She gets mad at everything we do. She gets mad at the way we do things. Christa: “Ray, what is this?” Ray: What? Christa: Your cookie crumbs. Next time can you clean them up? Would be nice, thank you! Ray: Sure. I’m hoping that we can find some help and something that would really help our relationship but more that help her not have to go through these cycles that she goes through every single month. So I’m just hoping she can get help like I’ll get out of here. She is coming out. Dr. Lisa: We’re lucky to have Ray and his wife Christa here, with us today. Thank you so much. And so, how long have you been married? Ray: Ten years. Dr. Lisa: Ten years? So you’ve hung in there even with this PMS? Ray: Oh yeah. Dr. Lisa: Has it been through ever since you’ve known her? Ray: Did? Yes. Dr. Lisa: The entire basket? He loves you then. Ray: Well the other side is so great, it’s worth it. Dr. Lisa: There you go. Love it. And tell me how do you feel when this happens? Christa: You know it’s like there’s two weeks out of the month where you’re--you’re fairly normal and then you know about two weeks before I start, I’m just this completely different person. I’m moody, I’m hungry. People, just everything that irritates me, my patience are zero. Dr. Lisa: And what you’re describing is real PMS or Premenstrual Syndrome is absolutely real. It is real as the period begins every month. It’s a price that women pay for being able to bring life into the world because every time you ovulate and you have a period, it’s that change of hormones after ovulation--those two weeks. And that can be a lot if it’s every month where you have that cycle of the hormones changes and we’re not sure exactly what caused it but it is related to serotonin, which is a neurotransmitter. This is actually a chemical imbalance that can go on with women. 80% of women experience this. So men, you got to figure out how to get with the program. And, we as women have to figure out how to control those times in month because--and the thing is, it’s a syndrome of emotions, of symptoms, fatigue for some women. Some women can--can’t get out of the bed. They just can’t get through the day so fatigue, tension, feeling agile. I think we started to use being little edgy there, feeling a lot edgy, anxiety, anger. And these can get so severe to the point where they interfere with daily lifestyle, relationships, work, so--and that’s called PMDD and that can be really, really severe where it's almost to a depression type of disorder. So these are really important symptoms. Then, you can also have physical symptoms from bloating to breast tenderness. All these can just be--I mean, you feel like maybe you just want to stay in bed and have a bucket of ice cream next to you or pizza or whatever. But really what you need to do is figure out how to control those either with diet. Diet can be very helpful. Exercise can be very helpful or there are also other things. There are medications as well. Have you tried anything? Christa: I mean I workout two hours everyday. I eat a healthy diet. I take tons of vitamins. I take my Omegas. I mean, I don’t know what else I can do. Dr. Lisa: Have you had any blood test? Have you gone to the doctor? Christa: No. Dr. Lisa: So you might want to start with blood test because there’s other you know, the other illnesses they can sometimes exacerbate this as well as stress. Stress can exacerbate PMS to the point where it is very difficult to deal with. Do you happen to have any lab test or hormone done? So you might want to start with that because it could be something else, maybe have a little fibroid issue that’s going on that’s exacerbating this as well. So it’s really important ladies to talk to your Gynecologist, to talk to your doctors if it’s real

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