This medical video explores the advancement in the restoration of sight.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: Not long ago, this was impossible for Rick Lewis. Rick Lewis: One of the things that I noticed real soon after I had my stroke is that when someone would throw me a ball, that I couldn't catch it. I couldn't coordinate what I was seeing with my eyes, with my hands. Jennifer Matthews: Rick had a stroke eight-years-ago and he lost most of his vision on the right side. One-year-ago, Dr. Nancy Newman had nothing to offer Rick, but now she has an answer. Dr. Nancy Newman: The idea is to try to rehabilitate and improve visual field defects in patients who have suffered brain injury of various types. Jennifer Matthews: The makers of Novavision VRT claim it stimulates healthy neurons in the brain to make up for damaged ones, filling in some of the darkness. Rick does it twice a day, six days a week. He stares at a center point and clicks the computer mouse when a dot appears on screen. Critics question whether the therapy really works. Dr. Newman isn't sure. Dr. Nancy Newman: Frankly, if the patient is improved in their functional daily living, then that's terrific. Rick Lewis: I found that my vision had improved by approximately 14 to 15%. Jennifer Matthews: Therapy lasts six months, and so far, for Rick, it's been a success. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement