In this medical video learn about a new techniques for treating fibromyalgia.
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Jennifer Mathews: Karen Smaby loves cooking for her family, but she didn't always have the energy to pull a meal together. Karen Smaby: There were some days I literally couldn't get out of bed Jennifer Mathews: Karen is among the three to six million Americans coping with Fibromyalgia, a disease that causes chronic pain in many parts of the body. Karen Smaby: It's like having the flu and having been in an auto accident where you had like tensed up really bad and all your muscles ached. Jennifer Mathews: University of Cincinnati Dr. Lesley Arnold is studying the use of the anti-depressant Cymbalta, also called Duloxetine. Dr. Lesley Arnold: The most important thing is they report a reduction in pain. Karen Smaby: Primarily through my neck, a little bit of my hips -- Jennifer Mathews: Patients like Karen also said they had more energy and could function better. Karen Smaby: There's like this low level of depression that goes along with it. I think partially because you do feel so miserable all the time, and that's completely gone. Jennifer Mathews: Although 90% of Fibromyalgia sufferers are women, the men in the study did not see a major change, but researchers aren't sure exactly why? Dr. Lesley Arnold: Women in general in normal situations synthesize serotonin at a lesser rate than men, so women may be more susceptible because of that. Jennifer Mathews: Meanwhile, Karen's finally happy to have the energy to do simple tasks, like cook a meal. This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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