Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation in Pediatrics Video

Andrew D. Blaufox, MD Pediatric Electrophysiology Schneider Children's Hospital . Associate Professor Clinical Pediatrics Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Medical School: Albert Einstein College of Medicine . Residency: Mount Sinai School ...
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Speaker: If you had someone diagnosed for instance Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, you can do something today to either obliterate or make it less of a problem, something you can do? Andrew D. Blaufox: Yes. Unfortunately if someone has Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and is determined to be at risk for sudden death then medication will not be helpful. The medicine can treat the SVT which is the more benign rhythm problem associated with WPW but it does not alleviate the risk for sudden death, and those patients are deemed to be at risk for sudden death and that risk depends upon how quickly electricity can go through those extra connections that are associated with WPW. And if someone has connections that can conduct electricity rapidly the only way to cure them or make them safe is for them to undergo an ablation. Speaker: When you are using a term define that term for us correctly. You can actually treat these conditions by doing what? Andrew D. Blaufox: We can do a procedure that's called an Ablation. Speaker: Okay what does that mean? Andrew D. Blaufox: An ablation is a procedure that is a type of catheterization where a patient is coming to the hospital, they go to sleep with general anesthesia and we place several catheters which are plastic tubes and those catheters go into their veins and their leg on each side and one into their neck, and these catheters have electrodes at one end and wires that run through them that get hooked into a computer and I can see the electrical signals occurring within the heart after we place the catheters through the veins and into the heart. Then we can isolate any abnormal electrical connections and take another special catheter to form a very tiny scar by either heating up or freezing the heart muscles or ablating it and getting rid of those abnormal cells. Speaker: So actually you can make a dangerous situation a lot less dangerous. Andrew D. Blaufox: Maybe we can then cure it, so there is no need to take medications any more. We can do this for patients of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome or patients of other forms of SVT as well.

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