This is a medical video about the procedure of helping breast cancer patients with radiation in a balloon.
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Jennifer Matthews: It was seven months ago when Bonnie Olson found out she had breast cancer. It was her fourth time with the disease. Bonnie Olson: I guess we had some hope knowing that this wasn't as aggressive. Jennifer Matthews: Treatment was also different. Instead of radiation five days a week, or five to six weeks, Bonnie had it for one week. Rachel Rabinovitch is her doctor. Dr. Rachel Rabinovitch: A lot of issues that I think make the daily radiation treatment that we know is extremely effective, nevertheless very difficult. Jennifer Matthews: A woman has a lumpectomy to remove the tumor. Within a few weeks, surgeons implant the balloon. Dr. Rachel Rabinovitch: This catheter is tunneled through the breast, so that this balloon ends up in the hole or the cavity where the tumor was removed from. Jennifer Matthews: Each day, radiation is delivered into the balloon. Dr. Rachel Rabinovitch: You can see the catheter through which the radiation will go and again, sit in the center of this balloon. Jennifer Matthews: Bonnie was a good candidate because her tumor was slow growing. Dr. Rachel Rabinovitch: She was very excited to do this since this was a very good prognosis tumor overall, and this way she didn't have to have a mastectomy. Bonnie Olson: For some reason, I'm just having to fight these battles every once in a while. I'm doing fine, which feels good. Jennifer Matthews: This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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