Preseason Sports Physical Evaluation Video

Sports Injury Forum - Michael DeFranco MD with guest - Paul Gubanich MD, Medicine Specialist, Team Physician, Cleveland Browns Football Team Director, Primary Care Sports Medicine Research,Cleveland Clinic http://www.artistfirst.com/sportsinjuryfo...
Read the full transcript »

Preseason Sports Physical Evaluation Interviewee: Now, how frequently these should be done? Most recommendations currently believe that this can be occurred once a year and that is reasonable. That may change with specific athletes in terms of if they have an injury or if they have additional concerns that they may want to touch base with their provider more frequently than that but most of the athletes are training good portions of the year at this point. If they are doing okay and they are not having any new issues, then I don’t think they probably need to see someone each quarter; unless, they have any questions or concerns. But I would also say that when they are being screened, they should make sure that their provider knows what sports they do plan on anticipating over those periods of time. For instance, our pre-participation exam for some sports maybe slightly different based on those activities than if they are in different sports throughout the year that we may tailor that slightly to accommodate that. Interviewer: During a typical preseason evaluation that you would do, what are some of the examples of red flags that you would pick out during that evaluation that would indicate a player should temporarily or permanently be restricted from play? Interviewee: Good question. Well first I will touch base in what the process is and a better understanding of what red flags we’re looking for. First of all, there are some great published tools that are widely utilized that are obtainable over the internet. The ACSM, American College Sports Medicine, AMSSM and several other groups have come up with a consensus document that fit for history and physical evaluation of this type for multiple age groups. Some of the high schools have their own. The Ohio High School Athletic Association in our state has their own form that has been put together, and then each governing body sometimes has their own requirements as well. So, you should look at who is actually requiring this and what information they need. But the history is probably one of the most important parts of the assessments. History in general, the athletes history, have they had one red flag, it’s if they’ve had a new restrictions in the past for any reason. Another red flag is if they are having any problems with dizziness, chest pains, shortness of breath, any exertional type symptoms. And there should be any good history and physical should have some kind of cardiac screening with the questions in American Heart Association has included those in most of these standard documents and should be included in other ones if they choose to use other forms. The history alone will pick up most of the questions or concerns that we have in athletes. We have seen athletes that are still symptomatic from concoctions from their previous season of football, is a previous year of football which would obviously be a concern. Physical can be important and can give us additional information. We do things like blood pressure screen which is good to know and there are certain parameters that if they are outside of those realms would be a red flag, at least for immediate participation. Visual screens, looking for any unusual, unpaired organs on the exams, other opportunities depending on the resources available, EKGs are done at some level. Some people have labs done. One additional red flag would be a new heart murmur that is diagnosed on the exam which could again limit to someone’s participation. So, the good news is that most people who have this pre-participation evaluations, only a small fraction, probably 5% or more are even temporarily excluded and then ultimately, I would say 1% to 2% utmost are ultimately undergo some kind of permanent restrictions in their activity. So, most of the things that we pick up are fairly minor or correctable or with further investigation can be cleared and the athlete can progress back of their sport. But there are a few instances where we do pick u

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement