Prenatal Yoga Benefits Video

In this video we learn about the benefits of prenatal yoga and how it helps with delivery.
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Janet Balaskas: When I was pregnant with my second child who is now 27 years ago, I joined a yoga class and it was an ordinary class but I found that many of the position that we did in the yoga class were very helpful as preparation for upright birth at labor and birth positions. At that time most people gave birth lying down on their backs but I've been researching in the history of childbirth and I've notice throughout history and every culture in the planet is about women stood up were kneeling, standing, squatting during labor and birth. And it seemed to be very unusual for women to lie so I got the idea that it might be more practical and I began to research sort of a design of a women’s body, sort of looking at the structure of the pelvic anatomy and so on. And I've realized that the whole design of a women’s body is made for upright labor and birth. And somehow the two things just came together that yoga was a really good preparation for using this positions because you know as western women, were not that used to squatting and kneeling. You know a lot of the time you sit on chairs and we drive in cars. So our body habits are not particularly good for labor and birth. And yoga helps to increase the flexibility of the pelvic joints and to make women more comfortable in positions like squatting and kneeling. And those two things came together in my awareness and active birth was born more or less. Katrina Campbell: Its just really help me switch off, be able to switch off from come off busy in London and going to work and everything you know you can always your pregnant because you're so busy rushing around. And it’s great to be able to come to place like this and really relax and spend time thinking about your baby and doing the right exercises. It has a really positive effect. Kim Ye Shie: It’s been wonderful, it’s been really relaxed and it naturally helped me with breathing. And in all the time I was working I have found that it was a race to come ones a week just come to a class for a couple hours and then sleeping it afterwards as well. Alona Pardo: I think this class has helped me prepare mentality, I was learning this ability for that kind of challenge. And so to give the strength and to give me relaxation but more than anything it’s the confidence to feel that I practice and I know. And I'm coming in with this much kind of information and as I can get. Ruscha Clifford: Well, there is a big transition between not being pregnant and being pregnant. And for a long while if you don’t actually grow that much its quite hard to connect with the idea of having baby inside you and the one of the nice things about coming to a class is being in an environment with other expectant mothers and spending time bonding in a way of having a sense of a new life born inside you apart from the exercise and learning how the body relates to the birth process and the changes. Janet Balaskas: Now, I'm going to roll the ball so that it’s just going to touch your low back, very low down. You feel that? How does that feel? Are you, okay, I’ll bring my legs in beside and now you could come back and rest you over to my knees and that’s to get a sit. And this is a really great way to be supportive in the squatting position. Many, many people realized that the medical model is great with their problems. You know are very lucky to have all the obstetric backup but its—doesn’t work as a routinely applied to normal mothers having healthy pregnancies and uncomplicated labors are much better off with something that enables them to use they're instinct because we know how to give birth, its in us. It’s in every single woman and what I do in my work is help women find this connection with this instinct.

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