In this video, we take a look at postnatal osteopathy, and how mothers and babies benefit from it.
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Female Speaker: In an ideal world, every newly delivered mother and baby would benefit from a postnatal check up from a pediatric osteopath, to ensure that the effect of labor, delivery and birth don’t go unresolved. Lawrence Stevens decided to bring six day old Lola to the Osteopathic Center for children, so that both she and her baby could be treated. Karen Carroll: Yeah, I mean a lot of it is just really helping her body adapt to the changes of having given birth because it’s actually one of the hardest things that most of us will ever do and it’s for someone and it can be almost like running on earth, it can be a huge run process. And cough wouldn’t help here that to do this to help the pelvis to settle back down into its pre-pregnancy physician to help the internal concert back down to the -- physician things gradually change and nice anyway but he is very well designed to do that but if you had a very long labor, a very difficult labor for you doesn’t always see that quite as easily. So that’s one of things that we can do. Unknown Speaker: It isn’t uncommon for women to experience problems after birth from low back pain to headaches, stress in continents to pain during its course, all of which can be addressed that much more easily shortly after the birth. Lawrence’s baby needed an assisted delivery using ventouse and that’s left her head slightly tender and misshapen. Unknown Speaker 2: Sometime what we are looking at is, the skull is almost like a membranous bag at this point in time that it’s called bony stiffness in it, but it isn’t sort of a less porotic variety of skull that we associate with what a skull looks like. So, it’s actually much more fluid, much more membranous, so when you apply a ventouse, the ventouse obviously compresses and you put a lot of pressure on to them to hold out, and that can compress some of the structure that we put the tentorium. And underneath the tentorium and around the tentorium, there are basket of sinuses, so, they can actually get a bit of a headache from back compression and that congestion as well as obviously having a bruce symptom from the ventouse. Unknown Speaker: Kate Hammer was helped through a difficult pregnancy by the OCC, when she suffered from pre-eclampsia, a condition affecting one in ten pregnant women where they develop high blood pressure together with protein in the urine. The anti and postnatal care offered by the center for her and her baby Audrey have helped them through out. Kate Hammer: I had pre-eclampsia, so from week 28, I was actually quite ill and I really relied on the treatments that I was getting and just the support and caring I was getting here. The day before Audrey decided to come, four weeks early, I was treated and they osteopathist said, this baby is ready come out, which was very reassuring when I found I was at the hospital the next day, and then it’s all happening. Unknown Speaker: Audrey, who is now 13 months was born four weeks early and stayed in hospital for a month. She is now back on track, but need some treatment for mobility. Karen Carroll: When we look at children, we look at how the kids internally or externally rotate. So, we’ve been looking at that with Audrey and help him, that’s almost tends to turn into release back out, and then we were also been working on the spine on the muscles of locomotion and on sort of hire out doing the spinal, which is where you do your walking from.

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