In this medical video learn how a web-like cap is helping doctors figure out exactly where in the brain epileptic seizures are happening, so they can help patients have better lives.
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Jennifer Matthews: This cap is going to tell doctors exactly where Dawn Helton's seizures are happening in her brain. She's struggled with them for four years. Dawn Helton: I'm scared but excited because I want them to find out what's going on. Jennifer Matthews: Dawn was the fifth patient in the world to try the new Geodesic Sensor Net (GSN). Electrodes record brain waves around the head and let doctors see the seizures as they happen. John Miller: With this method, we might be able to find out where the seizures are coming from exactly and then go right to the operation to take out that area. Jennifer Matthews: The hope is the cap will be used instead of the current invasive method, where surgeons place electrodes directly on the brain before removing the problem area. Old systems only used 25 electrodes. This new one uses 256. It can pinpoint the correct area of the brain within two centimeters. Dawn is hoping the precision will pay off for her and her boyfriend. Dawn Helton: Let's find it, let's do it, to stop these seizures. Jennifer Matthews: Because of the seizures, she can no longer work or drive. Sometimes, it's even hard to speak. Dawn Helton: Hoping and sadness of each seizure that it's just wanting to end. Jennifer Matthews: She hopes what they find today, might make the next seizure, her last. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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