This medical video focuses on the new technology allowing to pin point whether a person's chest pain is a real cause for concern.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: Millions of Americans have chest pain, but a heart problem isn't always the culprit. Dr. Vasken Dilsizian: It's a very difficult diagnosis to make whether chest pain is coming from the heart or not. Jennifer Matthews: Unless patients go to the hospital soon after or during their chest pain, it's hard for doctors to determine what's causing it. A stress test like this will usually give them some answers. Retired Colonel John Jordan is having his third stress test. Dr. Vasken Dilsizian: We'd like to have an agent that we can inject at rest without having to put you on a treadmill that could actually have imprints of what happens five hours or 8 hours or 30 hours ago. Jennifer Matthews: Now, researchers are studying a new injectable agent called Zemiva that could do just that. A standard stress test measures blood flow. Doctors can see the break in flow during exercise. But when imaged three hours later, blood flow returns to normal, so doctors don't know there's a problem. Zemiva measures metabolism, so doctors can clearly see the problem up to 30 hours later. Dr. Vasken Dilsizian: The beauty is that while blood flow returns back to baseline, the switch in metabolism persists, and therefore, we can image it much longer than what we would do with blood flow. Jennifer Matthews: The cause of the pain could be found in less than one hour! John Jordan: If you had something that could be done in an hour or less, it'd be very, very convenient. Jennifer Matthews: John has to stick with the stress test for now, but doctors say zemiva could be approved as early as 2007. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement