What does a physiotherapist do? What about an osteopath? In this video we learn what physiotherapy and osteopathy are and how they can be used to treat a variety of conditions.
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In this video we’ll find out what physical therapy is and the role that it has play in the treatment of many conditions. Mostly we talk about osteopathy and how the approach of both the physical therapist and osteopath differs from many health care professionals, I'm Phil Stallman and this is Treating Well. A physical therapist is a health care practitioners who deals from restoring movement and function to the body. Physical therapist where can I have wide variety of setting raging from intensive care to stroke rehabilitation to care of the elderly, to pediatrics and neurological cases as well. Then osteopath is a primary care practitioner who deals with the human body in a structure and functional way. Look at the body holistically so classically osteopath will treat problems such as back pain, neck pain or whip clash. Anything really with the body, which is involved with the bones and the joints we can treat. As of perhaps in physical therapist we primarily treat any muscular skeletal pain. Now what I mean by muscular skeletal is the muscles and the bones and the ligaments if you like the structure. So we like seeing a lot of back pain, neck pains, elbow, rest of the knees, jaws and of course real treatment. Any part of the body, which has a bone in it, tendon, muscular, ligament aspect to it. There are certain category of people that are not suitable for treatment, we classify this people as to fit them into red flags. And this red flags or things were we take alert and go “Hang on this might be something more serious than just a boney problem or a muscular problem or a ligament problem”. Such things as sometimes pain from go to travel down the arm and from the shoulder with, we've say heart problems. That’s not the sort of thing we want to see, if you start getting any severe numbness or weakness or any change in your bodies normal functions such as loss of bowel or bladder control. This is not appropriate for physical therapy.

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