Bessie Neshan, an IFPA Certified Personal Trainer, will help you achieve optimum health in the workplace whether you’re an employer, employee, work in an office or work from home. This video teaches you how to avoid Repetitive Strain Injuries at t...
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Physical Fitness at the Workplace - Forearms Exercising We’re going to move in to the forearms. Again, section by section we’re going to tackle these issues of the body. The forearms and the hands which get a lot of abuse with the mouse and keyboard and the phone, so let’s take it into simply dropping the arms down and we’re shaking out the hands. Maybe for 10, 15 seconds you shake it out. Then you take the arms down and you sweep the hand in, hold it for about three seconds, then you take it out and hold for three seconds. Take it in and you take it out. Some of them obviously you’re going to do more than one repetition. Then you take the hands out, out to the front, extend the arms and you simply flip them. I call them the hand flip. Take them out, bring them down, palms down and bring them up. Use good judgment. This again is your workout. This is your stretching workout. Take it to where you need it. Wrist bends, again a lot of tension resides in the forearms when you’re typing or using the mouse. So, take the palm downward and when you have that palm downward you’re actually stretching your extensors in your forearm. Get a good stretch. Then take the palm upward and you’re stretching the flexors of the forearm, and whatever we do on one side of the body you must do on the other. So take it downward on the left side, it doesn’t matter where you start. If you went right, left, it doesn’t matter, just get both in and palm up. Okay great. The next one we’re going to actually use the desk. So join me and hopefully you have a desk too. I’m sure if you’re watching this maybe you’re not exactly at the computer but try to apply this one at a desk. You’re going to take your hands in a prayer position and you’re going to press the wrist down into the desk. Don’t leave them elevated, that is not going to do you any good. You want to press down the wrist into the table or the desk stretching out those wrists. The last one I call it the finger curl. Meet me out center here, hands are extended, it’s a three-part move, hands are extended, you make a fist and if you’ll notice I’m going to turn to the side. I’m going to curl my fingers away from my palm. This is great especially if you do a lot of typing. I’m going to do it again. Extend the hands out, make a fist, and then curl the fingers away. We’ll do it one more time. Make sure you get this one because it’s three parts. Extend the arms out, make a fist, and then curl, see my hands slowly out. Good work. We’re going to move on to the next part, our upper back and our chest. So for the upper back and chest, you can proceed into a shoulder blade elevation and depression. So lift your arms up and then slowly take it down. Let’s do it again, arms up overhead, that’s the elevation part, you inhale and then you take it to the depression and you exhale. Let’s do it one more time. Inhale and press those shoulder blades back and down. You should feel those wing bones coming down in a triangular fashion. Okay the next stretch is also for the upper back and chest but also affects the lower back and the hips. Now if you’re chair is sturdy you can do it on the chair. It’s called arch and scoop. Simply take your hands behind you and arch the back and then scoop in the chest. But I’m going to show you also how to do this move standing up because if your chair is not sturdy it could be very dangerous because you can easily tip back if you’re not in a stable position if maybe the chair’s wheels and it’s not on a carpet. So I’m going to come up and perhaps you can do this with me too. We’re going to turn to the side and again you can put your hands here, sit up on a chair of course. You put it on the base of your lower back. So you’re going to arch the back and then you’re going to scoop it forward. You see how it can relieve the tension of the lower back and the hips as well? Open up again, arch and scoop. Let’s move in to the fullback position. We’re going to do it seated, but again, this could be d

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