Peggy S. Eicher MD, Medical Director: of the Center for Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing at St. Joseph's Children's Hospital New Jersey
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Well what did you learn from a medical school, well we may have learned about the oral motor development and the time of the emergency of suckle reflex sucking on to munching when the children are able to do soft pieces and then chewing or grinding up of meats. But other then that we really will have to think that children are born with the silver spoon in their mouth, you just come up and way they go, so what happens when that doesn’t work. Actually this child is not going to be an abnormality for your practice in that feeding problem actually a very prevalent for children with developmental disability the frequency is 30%-80% and actually and children without developmental disability 10%-40%. And Mayes and Volkmer published a 25% to 40% of toddlers and early school age children actually have common feeding problems whether its -- activity toddling or some difficulty with texture. 3-10% of those children will experience severe feeding problems hospital admission usually

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