Patients And Doctors Discuss The I-Port Video

In this medical health video learn how managing diabetes with an i-port ® means fewer needles through the skin, less pain and less scar tissue.
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Thomas Blevins: People have to inject themselves, who have diabetes think about it. People who don't have diabetes, never have to think about that. People with diabetes have to think about not only taking the shot, they have to think about injection, there might be some discomfort, and then they have to think about taking just the right dose to control the Glucose, the sugar. So all those things can cause anxiety, also the blood sugar is kind of bouncing around that can induce anxiety. Sheetal Verma: Well I had a great fear of needles and people think, well you are diabetic you shouldn't have a fear of needles. But I don't, yeah I don't like needles I don't like poking myself. Dobra Lofton: It was very difficult to administer my own injections, because I am afraid of needles and I don't like to be stuck. So poking in myself or sticking to myself seven times a day that was a challenge. Sheetal Verma: In the past I have had to do a six times I was testing for my blood sugar, I would have to do four injection a day. So ten times total. Rajat Bhushan: The most important thing which has recently come about is to allow multiple daily injections without having to penetrate your skin frequently. Thomas Blevins: In a sense it's a breakthrough of sorts for many patients. Frankly, some patients can give injections and they don't have problems with that. Now other patients don't like to give the injection as we discussed earlier, and I-Port through which they can give multiple injections is a big deal. Dobra Lofton: Prior to the I-Port I was having to stick myself, minimum seven times a day and that does not count the two to three skin punctures for carbs. When I count carbs, I need to take a small amount of insulin to adjust the blood sugar for the amount of carbs that I am about to ingest, until that was an additional two or three skin pokes, plus my regular seven skit needles sticks for my regular doses of insulin. So prior to the I-Port, I was taking a minimum of seven injections, or needle sticks per day, over a period of three days, which is how often you changed the I-Port that would be 21 needle sticks versus one. That's awesome to me. Thomas Blevins: Well the way the multiple injection port differs from a pump is that there is an injection port actually in sense for the pump connected to a tube and then there is the pump itself. So there is the sort of pump that's connected to it. The multiple injection port is simply the catheter that's put into the subcutaneous space, that's sits there without a tube and without a pump. And the person just gives the injection through it and then there is no connection there. Rajat Bhushan: It's just say a catheter which stays under the skin and there is dome where you can inject your injection. So you still have to give insulin through the syringes, so it's not a continuous delivery like pump will have. Although the principle is same that you can wore this port for three days and give all your insulin through it. Dobra Lofton: It's administered one day and you only have to change it on the third day. So seven needle sticks per day times three days, was 21 needle sticks or skin punctures over a period of three days, but with the I-Port it's one skin puncture a needle stick every three days. Now that's awesome. Thomas Blevins: This is the way this is inserted, there is a tiny needle. You only need to introduce your needle that's all it is, it surrounded by plastic catheter and this then inserted into the subcutaneous space like that. This goes in very easily and put the adhesive down, and then the inserted needle actually is then removed. And it's just started. Now what's left is this catheter is beneath the skin, its adhesed very well, stays on very easily, we leave it in for three days at a time. Now if I am going to inject insulin what I am going to do take my -- in this case pin, I could use a syringe, but in this case a pin. I am going to uncap the needle here, and I am going to go a

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