This is a medical video about there is an alternative to pap tests.
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Jennifer Matthews: A woman's annual Pap test can be a life saver. Enrique Hernandez: Of women that we diagnose with cervical cancer in the United States, almost half of them have never had a Pap smear. Jennifer Matthews: Pap tests can detect abnormal cells that lead to cervical cancer. But many women let their annual visit slide. The various instruments used can be uncomfortable, and let's face it, the examination is far from fun. Now, researchers are studying a new device that could change that. It's called the Bio-probe. Enrique Hernandez: Well, the Bio-probe has to be inserted into the vagina, and the woman herself could do it. It's so small that most women will consider it to be more comfortable than having a Pap smear. Jennifer Matthews: The probe remains inserted for ten seconds while it measures electrical resistance. Enrique Hernandez: It's believed that as the normal tissues progress from normal to cancer, the amount of blood and fluid in the tissues increases, and that causes a decrease in electrical resistance. Jennifer Matthews: Cris Roberts hopes the Bio-probe is approved. Cris Roberts: I don't like going to the doctor to get my Pap test done. I think it's really uncomfortable. I think it's really invasive. I even think it's really difficult to schedule it, and I would prefer if something was available that I could use in my house. Jennifer Matthews: Over the next 6 to 12 months, researchers will gather data to figure out whether the probe is as effective as a Pap test. If it is, this small device could make a big difference. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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