Overactive Bladder Disorder Video

This health video will focus on the treatments that are available for those who suffer from OBD (overactive bladder disorder).
Read the full transcript »

Shanon Vining: I knew where all the bathrooms in town were. Female Speaker: If I didn't get on time, possibly I could have an accident. Of course that's very embarrassing. Dr. Dean Edell: These women describe life with an overactive bladder. Dr. Christopher Smith: They have a bladder spasm and they can't make to the bathroom in time, so they saw that leak in their pants. It keeps patients from going out and doing the normal daily activities. Dr. Dean Edell: In the past few years, oral medications have become a leading choice for patients seeking help. Dr. Christopher Smith: The mainstay for treatment is basically a combination therapy between oral medications and behavioral therapy. Dr. Dean Edell: It's a treatment that can be convenience since patients are generally prescribed one pill a day. Dr. Christopher Smith: Medication works on the muscle itself. It blocks the receptors, that the Acetylcholine, the chemical that's released from nerve endings causes the muscle to contract. Dr. Sandra Emmons: The patient doesn't feel the urge to go to the bathroom quite so frequently. Dr. Dean Edell: The drugs can have side effects. Dr. Christopher Smith: They can often have side effects such as dry mouth, constipation. Dr. Dean Edell: That keeps researchers looking for new ways to ease the symptoms, experimental treatments like Botox and possible alternatives like acupuncture. Dr. Christopher Smith: A lot of patients are embarrassed because they don't know that there are treatments available. They don't know how common it is. Dr. Dean Edell: That's why doctors encourage patients to seek help. I'm Dr. Dean Edell.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement