Ovarian Cancer Treatment Vaccine Video

In this medical health video learn how difficult it is to detect and treat ovarian cancer which is the 5th leading cause of cancer death among women. Research into early detection and patient specific treatments may help turn the tide against this...
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Female Speaker: I cry. I was shocked and upset, because I -- you hear the word cancer and right away you think the worst. Dr. Dean Edell: It's called a silent killer. Ovarian cancer is difficult to detect, and because of that it's often not treated until its late stages. That's why six out of ten women diagnosed die. New types of screening and breakthroughs in treatment are the best hope at changing those odds. Female Speaker: Like on the spur of the movement. Female Speaker: I had no pain, no sign, or anything, the only thing that happened was there was a week there that I gained 10-12 pounds. Dr. Dean Edell: Big as it was, that was Jeane Groomer's only clue that she had ovarian cancer. Female Speaker: They immediately put me in the hospital. Dr. Dean Edell: According to the CDC, ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. It usually occurs in women over 50, who rarely have recognizable symptoms until the disease is well advanced. Tyler Curiel: It tends to spread through the lower pelvis, into the abdomen. Women oftentimes come in complaining that their pants don't fit. Dr. Dean Edell: So the push is on for ways to detect ovarian cancer and treat it earlier when the chances for survival are far better. Female Speaker: I am one of the lucky ones, it was found very early, stage 1, almost unheard up. Dr. Dean Edell: Diane Miller had a family history of cancer, so she underwent the CA-125 test, a screening that is only 60% accurate. Diane's results were negative. Diane Miller: I just had this fear that there might be something there. Dr. Dean Edell: So Diane pushed her doctor for an exploratory laparoscopic procedure, and then got the news that she did have ovarian cancer after all. Diane Miller: If we had gone with the original diagnosis and procedure, the cancer would not have been found. Patricia Kruk: Unfortunately, there is no reliable, accurate way to detect all ovarian cancers. Dr. Dean Edell: But researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Center are uncovering clues that could lead to better screenings. One is a protein found in urine, called Bcl-2. Patricia Kruk: Bcl-2 urinary levels were at least ten times greater than women without ovarian cancer. Dr. Dean Edell: Another clue can be found in blood. Rebecca Sutphen: If you look in the blood of women with ovarian cancer at the time of diagnosis, before they have had surgery or any treatment, there is a higher level of lysophosphatidic acid. There is no reason why we shouldn't be able to develop a blood test that will allow us to be close to 100% accurate. Dr. Dean Edell: There are also innovations in treating ovarian cancer. Along with the standard chemotherapy given through IV, doctors can administer chemo through a catheter directly to the abdomen. Kristine Zanotti: We might see these women actually living through what we would consider a cancer that otherwise might have taken their lives. Dr. Dean Edell: But even with surgery and chemotherapy, cancer often returns, and when it comes back, it's harder to fight. Sharad Ghamande: Soon you start becoming chemo resistant. Dr. Dean Edell: So doctors from the Medical College of Georgia are experimenting to see if they can extend remission. Sharad Ghamande: If you can extend it, the patient has a better chance of living longer, potentially. Dr. Dean Edell: A drug called A6 prevents blood vessels from feeding cancer cells. Women in the study delayed recurrence by an average of six months, which made the come back more treatable. Sharad Ghamande: It's almost like a new cancer and you can reoperate, regive them chemotherapy, and many of them will do fairly well. Dr. Dean Edell: Researchers are also looking at ways to muster the body's own defenses to fight recurrence. Sybilann Williams: When you are dealing with a cancer, is that, because it's your own cells, the cancer of your own cells, your immune system doesn't recognize the cancer as something that it should fight. Dr. Dean Edell: Cancer Tr

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