Paula shares her reaction to her original ovarian cancer diagnosis.
Read the full transcript »

I have to say that when I was first diagnosed, I don’t want to know anything about it, I didn’t ask after I had my surgery, what stage I was at. I just didn’t want to know anything. It was like, okay I have the surgery, now what? I'm going to die. What's the point? That’s the point I was at at that time. And my daughters were very supportive, my friends were supportive, Sam was very supportive, I mean we would sit and cry together. But I just was wanting to bury my head in sand. I didn’t ask any questions, okay I have to come here for chemo, I don’t want to know anything about it. I've changed a lot since then. But it’s denial and I was definitely in denial and I was scared, you know when people would say to me, “Well you know we could walk out and get hit by a car and die.” You know it’s like “Don’t you say that to me.” You know, the odds of that are less than with this diagnosis hanging over my head that I'm going to die from this disease.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement